A Conversation With Gary Pullin.

Goblin by Gary Pullin

Goblin by Gary Pullin

 

Ghoulish Gary Pullin. The name is synonymous with creatures, monsters, and all things creepy. Gary Pullin is the go-to guy when looking to create illustrations featuring such characters as The Mummy, Frankenstein’s Monster, or Jason Vorhees! As the former Art Director for widely read Rue Morgue Magazine, Gary was tasked with overseeing the total look of the Magazine, and he now serves as the Art Columnist for The Fright Gallery. Gary also spends time dabbling in the Film Poster Scene, producing illustrations for such classics as “The Descent”, “Friday The 13th: The Final Chapter”, and “Near Dark”. We’re very fortunate to have Gary as our guest today, where we discuss horror, illustration, and the current state of the Film Poster Scene. So, without further ado, here is A Conversation With Gary Pullin…

 

Frankenstein's Monster by Gary Pullin

Frankenstein’s Monster by Gary Pullin

 

igotbirds: Gary, we like to start off each conversation with the subject of the interview explaining how he chose a career in Illustration. Can you give our readers some background info, and how you chose your career path?

Gary Pullin: Sure, my Grandfather was an amateur painter so it’s pretty safe to say that’s where my artistic side comes from. He passed before I was borne, but my Dad had a lot of his paintings, mostly landscapes, around the house and I would try to copy them with pencils or charcoal. We were never very religious, but we did go to church when I was young and I can remember our family priest came by with a box of paper and markers. Well, I immediately started sketching a monster, I don’t think he knew just what he had started. I would draw pictures of Frankenstein, Freddy Krueger, Jason Voorhees, Darth Vader, Jaws. Other than baseball, I wasn’t really into sports. I was much happier drawing, listening to music or watching any horror film I could rent at our local video stores. I grew up in London, Ontario on movies, music, horror magazines and comics. I would walk miles to get the latest issue of Mad Magazine, Fangoria, GoreZone or Deep Red. My love of horror-inspired art really kicked into high gear when I discovered Basil Gogos‘ painted monster portraits on the covers of Famous Monsters. His ghastly colour pallet hooked me in right away. I’m very lucky that my parents and teachers (most of them) were cool and encouraged my fascination with all of this stuff. They wouldn’t let me watch anything harmful, but I was watching some pretty terrifying stuff at a very young age and reading it too. My mom was a big Stephen King fan, so I would pick up her books when she was finished. All of this was fuel for my fiendish imagination. I did okay in art through high school and went to a specialized art course at H.B. Beal for two years. After that, I enrolled in a three year graphic design and advertising program at Conestoga College in Kitchener. It can only be described as design boot camp but it’s what I needed and it really opened my eyes to the many avenues one could pursue in art. I graduated, moved to Toronto and landed a junior design position with a pretty swank commercial design firm. While I was there, I met the folks behind Rue Morgue Magazine when Montreal’s Fantasia Film Festival came through Toronto and basically demanded I become their art guy. The rest they say, is horror history.

 

Tiger Army by Gary Pullin

Tiger Army by Gary Pullin

 

igotbirds: You’ve produced a lot of Gig Posters for various bands, my personal favorite being the poster you created for Goblin’s 2013 US Tour. Can you talk a little about breaking into the Gig Poster Scene, and what challenges you face when designing for a band?

Gary Pullin: I think my first real gig poster were two posters for Electric Frankenstein, and they published them in an art book. Those got noticed and I was asked to do posters for The Gutter Demons, The Creepshow, Ghoultown and Tiger Army. Gig posters are a lot of fun to create. Unless there’s a specific direction given from the band, there’s really no parameters. You just need to create a compelling image that perhaps evokes the type of band you are creating artwork for. I guess the biggest challenge for myself as a younger designer was actually getting paid for the work or acquiring copies of the printed posters from the bands or promoters. Not so much anymore though. Although I’ve been focusing on film-inspired artwork lately, I’m just as passionate about music as I am movies. If the opportunity were to present itself, I would love to work on a gig poster again.

 

igotbirds: What drew you to begin illustrating film posters? Do you have a favorite illustration you have created based on a film?

Gary Pullin: I think it was just a natural progression from creating film-inspired artwork at Rue Morgue for all those years. My first very first screen-print was “Street Trash” for Mondo and I was hooked ever since. Some of my favourite recent posters are the “Teen Wolf” prints I did for Skuzzles, my “Vertigo”, “White Zombie” posters and the Tales From The Crypt 7″ vinyls I did with Mondo for their EC Comics art show. I really enjoy creating art for soundtrack re-issues, like the Re-Animator artwork I did for WaxWork Records and They Live for Death Waltz. I just finished the soundtrack artwork for Creepshow with Waxwork Records and I’m very excited for people to see it.

 

Vertigo by Gary Pullin

Vertigo by Gary Pullin

 

Near Dark by Gary Pullin

Near Dark by Gary Pullin

 

igotbirds: You’ve done some work for Mondo. How did you go about hooking up with Mondo to produce some Poster Art for them?

Gary Pullin: Mitch Putnam from Mondo reached out in 2009 to do the “Street Trash” poster. It was an experiment for me because it was my first screen print ever and I guess my first officially licensed film poster. Well, it didn’t sell out, so I was a bit disheartened by that and I didn’t hear from them for a while. I was holding down the art director gig at Rue Morgue at the time which left me with very little spare time, but I was committed to working with them again. I felt I had grown a bit since we last worked together and I showed them some recent work. Opening up a dialogue with Rob Jones and Justin Ishmael helped too, and before I knew it I was getting invites to their gallery shows and getting more poster gigs with them. They’re all great guys over there and have pushed me to up my game. I’m always very excited to work with them. I’ve got some cool things lined up with them and can’t wait to share.

 

The Descent by Gary Pullin

The Descent by Gary Pullin

 

igotbirds: I’d like to touch on two Posters in particular that I really enjoy as a viewer. So, let’s start off with the Poster you created for “The Descent”. To me, this Poster really encapsulates the totality of the film. I love that the center image forms an almost coffin-like shape. Just a really powerful piece of art. Could you talk a bit about your process in creating this image?

Gary Pullin: “The Descent” is an exceptional modern horror film, and I’m a big fan. I worked with Fright Fest Originals in the UK on it and I had this idea that the caves are like a claustrophobic tomb for the spelunkers, so that’s where the coffin motif comes from. I had a lot of fun hiding stuff in the rocks too.

 

Friday The 13th: The Final Chapter by Gary Pullin

Friday The 13th: The Final Chapter by Gary Pullin

 

igotbirds: Another Poster of yours I really enjoy is the “Friday The 13th: The Final Chapter” piece you did for Mondo. I absolutely love the colors in this print. I also like that the composition is one in which Jason is taking up the entire field of view! Very powerful and dynamic. What led you to the composition you chose for the Poster? Was it something you had in mind from the beginning or was it worked and re-worked until it was close to what you envisioned?

Gary Pullin: I am an unapologetic “Friday the 13th” fan, Part IV being a favourite, so I practically begged Rob at Mondo to do one for the Final Chapter. I came up with about eight different concepts. One featured Tommy behind a broken Jason mask, a really violent version that featured Voorhees’ death-slide down the machete, one with a nod to Crispin Glover’s infamous awkward dance, but I couldn’t use Corey Feldman and Glover’s likeness, or even place in a credit deck. But I’m really happy with the bold result of Jason coming through Tommy’s door. On my concepts I presented to Mondo, I called it “Heeeeeere’s Jason!” which is a not-so-subtle nod to “The Shining“.

 

The Big Lebowski by Gary Pullin

The Big Lebowski by Gary Pullin

 

igotbirds: Your great poster for “The Big Lebowski” is quite a departure from your “ghoulish” work that most fans are familiar with. Was it a nice change of pace for you to show you can illustrate more than monsters and creatures from the depths of Hades?

Gary Pullin: Thanks man, I’m really glad you mentioned that because yes, it was a nice change and although horror is where my heart is, I’d like collectors and clients to see that I am capable of creating artwork for non-genre properties too. I was glad The Poster Collective had me in mind for “The Big Lebowski”. I love all types of films and I enjoy tapping into that diversity when given the chance. I’m working towards it, but I would love more opportunities to do key art for non-genre stuff. Also, I would jump at the chance to do an officially licensed John Hughes “Weird Science” or “The Breakfast Club” poster or something from just about any Tarantino flick.

 

An American Werewolf in London by Gary Pullin

An American Werewolf in London by Gary Pullin

 

igotbirds: Looking at your Website, it’s a given that you love illustrating Monsters. Your “An American Werewolf in London” piece is just awesome, and once again I love the color palette you’re working with in this piece. I get a sense that you really respect the history of the Monster, and wish to translate that respect to the viewer through your work. Can you talk about those Monsters which are near and dear to you, and is there a Monster that you’re dreaming of illustrating in the future?

Gary Pullin: Nobody paints monsters better than Basil Gogos, so every time I sat down to create a Rue Morgue cover, it was always a deliberate tribute to him and what his art brought to the grandaddy of all horror magazines, Famous Monsters of Filmland. When I got the gig at Rue Morgue, I wanted it to stand out visually, so I would push myself to create something I thought monster fans would appreciate and also, grab that kids’ attention when they are standing there deciding what mag to buy. The art behind mainstream horror magazines pretty much dried up somewhere in the ’90s and one thing I felt strongly about was bringing some that back to genre publications. Hopefully readers felt as though they were holding onto something with a bit more passion behind the pages than the competitors and it would be something to keep and collect. “The American Werewolf” cover you mentioned is a personal favourite for a few reasons, mainly because it features David Naughton and not the wolf. I also really enjoyed doing the “Hobo With A Shotgun” cover, the Lucio Fulci “Zombie” issue, the “Psycho” issue and issue #100 which was black on black with a varnish overlay. You have to understand that once the cover story was settled, when it came time to design or illustrate the covers, we didn’t have a lot of time under the ever-present pendulum of a monthly deadline so I’m really proud of the quality of work that we were able to accomplish there.

 

igotbirds: Let’s talk the state of the Film Poster Scene. With documentaries coming out and Mondo prints selling out in seconds, where do you see the future of the scene? In your opinion, how big could it get?

Gary Pullin: We’re seeing more and more illustrated work seeping into the marketing of films and more illustrated posters in the multiplexes. I’d be happy to see it become the norm again. I hope it gets bigger. It’s great for the artists of course but also for film fans. Even casual movie fans can appreciate an effective poster. I’m beyond thrilled to see more and more doors swinging open for this type of art. A lot of the work that’s being produced lately is truly incredible and I hope the trend becomes the norm.

 

igotbirds: Finally Gary, can you tell people where to find you online? Website, Facebook, Twitter, etc…?

Gary Pullin: Sure! You can find me at:

 

Once again, we would like to give a big thanks to Gary Pullin for taking the time away from his busy schedule to participate in our interview. Please be sure to click on the links included in this conversation, and check out more of Gary’s work at www.ghoulishgary.com!

A Conversation With Laurent Durieux.

The Birds by Laurent Durieux

The Birds by Laurent Durieux

 

Hot on the heels of Laurent Durieux’s highly successful solo show at Mondo Gallery, igotbirds.com was able to score a short interview with a true modern master of Film Poster Illustration. We would like to thank Laurent and his brother Jack for their participation with the following interview. And now…A Conversation With Laurent Durieux!!

 

igotbirds: Laurent, could you give our readers a bit of background information about yourself? How did you first become interested in art and illustration?

Laurent Durieux: Well, I’ve been interested in Art and drawing from as far as I can remember. Ever since I was a kid, like so many children of my age, only I had the chance to have very encouraging parents who have always supported me in my decisions and choices. My older brother Tom, and my father as a matter of fact, both went to a very good Art school in Brussels and so that was it. I had to follow my father and brothers paths. I got introduced to the work of Jean “Moebius” Giraud through the Heavy Metal magazine (Métal Hurlant) and that day I decided that it’s really what I wanted to do. To be a comic book artist. So, for many years, I have put all my time and energy in doing the only thing I was good at, drawing. To the point I was offered a contract by one of the major comic book publishing company in France. I had to decline though when I saw what was in that shitty contract. That was bad then, it’s even worse today…So I changed path and decided I would become a Graphic Designer and Illustrator, which would enable me to make a more substantial living, and that’s what I did.

 

igotbirds: What draws you to illustrate for Film Posters? Do you have a favorite illustration you have created based on a film?

Laurent Durieux: I see myself as a story teller, and the love of comics has never left me. I’ve always loved telling stories in my images…I know of so many comic artists who in some point in their career have switched to cinema, and it’s all very logical, There is not really any big difference between telling a story on paper or on film, the hard part is raising the money to produce a movie. A few people in the States know this but I actually directed a short Canal+ produced CGI animated movie a few years ago titled “HellVille” which I had written and designed, which turned out to be a very big disappointment, probably due to the fact that this 4 minutes short had been done by students in about 8 weeks…but that’s another story…the favourite illustration I have created for a film? It’s hard to choose, they are all sort of my babies, but if I had to, it would either be “Iron Giant” because it’s the first one I did for Mondo, and “Metropolis” because the good folks at Dark Hall Mansion are the first to have trusted me and given me the opportunity to work for the US fan base.

 

Hellville by Laurent Durieux

Hellville by Laurent Durieux

 

The Iron Giant by Laurent Durieux

The Iron Giant by Laurent Durieux

 

Metropolis-Standard Edition by Laurent Durieux

Metropolis-Standard Edition by Laurent Durieux

 

Metropolis-Alternate Edition by Laurent Durieux

Metropolis-Alternate Edition by Laurent Durieux

 

igotbirds: What decisions do you make as an artist when illustrating a poster for a film?

Laurent Durieux: Well first I need to somehow relate to the movie, I’m not comfortable working on a movie I don’t actually like or a genre I’m not really into, like horror movies or zombie stuff, you know. I’m sort of an old school guy. Then I see if I can add something to the movie poster that hasn’t already been done before. A different take on it, though this is not always possible, at least be original graphically and most importantly faithful to the movie as well. As far as decisions I would make as an artist, in the drawing and composition sense of it, there is just too many decisions to enumerate them all here, I make a decision every second for the whole of 3 weeks I work on an image. I’m sure it’s like that for every artist.

 

igotbirds: You’ve just had a massively successful solo show at Mondo Gallery in Austin, Texas. Were you at all surprised by the overwhelming amount of fans here in the United States?

Laurent Durieux: Oh yes, you bet! This was unbelievable to see these people spending the night in the freezing cold just to be able to secure a few posters. In the same time, I’m not naive, I am aware that many of these people are there not so much for me but more for the Mondo poster phenomenon, you know a lot of those posters that were sold on the opening day had been flipped on eBay that very night, and we’re talking dozens of them. Nevertheless, it was a real pleasure to meet the fans the next day at the signing sessions, people drove or flew from so far it left me speechless. I want to thank all these people for that!

 

Soundwave by Laurent Durieux

Soundwave by Laurent Durieux

 

igotbirds: Can you give us a hint about any upcoming projects you may be working on?

Laurent Durieux: I have so many exciting projects scheduled for this year, that it is actually already fully booked. I have given a hint of the very next project I’m working on, but you’ll have to check my Facebook page for that!

Cheers, Laurent

 

You can find more of the works of Laurent Durieux by clicking on the following links:

 

Once again, our sincere thanks to Laurent and Jack for making this interview possible!

 

The Master by Laurent Durieux

The Master by Laurent Durieux

 

The Wolf Man by Laurent Durieux

The Wolf Man by Laurent Durieux

 

Rear Window by Laurent Durieux

Rear Window by Laurent Durieux

 

King Kong by Laurent Durieux

King Kong by Laurent Durieux

 

Jaws by Laurent Durieux

Jaws by Laurent Durieux

 

Dracula by Laurent Durieux

Dracula by Laurent Durieux

 

Back To The Future II by Laurent Durieux

Back To The Future II by Laurent Durieux

 

Back To The Future II variant by Laurent Durieux

Back To The Future II variant by Laurent Durieux

 

Mondo’s Laurent Durieux Drop: Part 2!

On Tuesday, February 18, 2014, Mondo continues dropping prints from the massively successful Laurent Durieux solo show held at Mondo Gallery in Austin, TX.


Rear Window by Laurent Durieux

Rear Window by Laurent Durieux

“Rear Window” Poster by Laurent Durieux. 24″x36″ screen print. Hand numbered. Edition of 375. Printed by D&L Screenprinting. $60


Forbidden Planet by Laurent Durieux (Regular)

Forbidden Planet by Laurent Durieux (Regular)

“Forbidden Planet” Poster by Laurent Durieux. 24″x36″ screen print. Hand numbered. Edition of 425. Printed by D&L Screenprinting. $60


The Creature From The Black Lagoon by Laurent Durieux

The Creature From The Black Lagoon by Laurent Durieux

“The Creature From The Black Lagoon” Poster by Laurent Durieux. 24″x36″ screen print. Hand numbered. Edition of 275. Printed by D&L Screenprinting. $60


The Day The Earth Stood Still by Laurent Durieux

The Day The Earth Stood Still by Laurent Durieux

“The Day The Earth Stood Still” Poster by Laurent Durieux. 24″x36″ screen print. Hand numbered. Edition of 325. Printed by D&L Screenprinting. $55

Once again, another fabulous drop from Mondo. Oh…and now that we think about it…we may just have an interview coming up that ties into the recent Durieux solo show. You may want to check back often because you never know who might pop in to say “hi”!


A Conversation With Matt Ryan Tobin.

Matt Ryan Tobin-True Romance

Matt Ryan Tobin-True Romance

 

Tonight we are beyond pleased to feature Canadian Designer & Illustrator, Matt Ryan Tobin. Matt took time away from his schedule to answer all sorts of questions from us, touching upon his early years as an illustrator to his opinion on the now booming popularity of the Gig and Film Poster Scene. Our sincere thanks to Matt for taking some time to speak with us. And now…A Conversation With Matt Ryan Tobin!

 

igotbirds: Matt, we like to start things off by asking the illustrators we interview if they could tell us a little about their background. What led you to decide on a career in Design/Illustration?

Matt Tobin: I’ve always been drawing. Since I was a little kid but being the kind of person I am – I was always searching for my place in the world. I was into a lot of things growing up. Dipping my toes in everything. When I was around 9 the doodles kind of came to a halt and music took over. It’s my first passion. I started playing guitar and everything changed. When I was in high school is when I got back into it. I sucked at everything that wasn’t a class that allowed me to express myself. I did everything in my power to get by on Creative Writing, Art, Photography and Film classes. It was around that time drawing and design kicked back in.

 

igotbirds: You’ve done a decent amount of design work and illustration for apparel and logo/branding gigs. Can you tell us about how you came to find yourself illustrating and designing for bands?

Matt Tobin: I really started taking it seriously around 2003 when my band at the time, and for 10 years to follow, Dead And Divine was in need of t-shirt designs for our first few shows. We had no money to pay an artist, nor knew any around. I was familiar in Photoshop already so I dove in. From there I just kept designing our merch and eventually word got around that’s what I did. Shortly after other bands began asking me to design their merch as well. Design was always something I’ve been passionate about. I used to design band fan websites purely for fun. There was this small online circle of websites run and created by fans. It was a way to take a theme I was passionate about and create something based on it. I think thats why I eventually fell in love with film poster design. Taking an existing theme (in these cases bands and films) and creating something to compliment it or honour it from an fanboy/artistic standpoint.

 

Matt Ryan Tobin-As I Lay Dying

Matt Ryan Tobin-As I Lay Dying

 

igotbirds: I have to say that your T-Shirt designs and illustrations for As I Lay Dying are really great pieces. I would think for a “heavier” band such as themselves, skulls and snakes seem to fit pretty well with their overall motif. Do you have a lot of artistic freedom in the kinds of designs that you produce for a band like As I Lay Dying?

Matt Tobin: Thanks man! Well it depends. Sometimes bands have a ready concept they want to see executed. Those are my favourite to do. I can always add my own flare but it helps when bands give direction. If it’s a band I’ve worked for consistently, I tend to know what they’re into and at that point I just whip things up I think would work for them and it usually flies. It’s fun to have that comfortability with a client.

 

Matt Ryan Tobin-Underoath

Matt Ryan Tobin-Underoath

 

igotbirds: You’ve also produced some Gig Posters for bands like Underoath, which by the way is a really stunning poster. What kind of choices do you have to make as an artist when deciding on a theme for a Gig Poster?

Matt Tobin: Thank you again! That was a lot of fun to make. The band gave me full artistic freedom on that print. It was a farewell tour poster – so, in my eyes, it had to encompass death. It’s one of those pieces that I don’t think I really put too much thought into. Just kind of went with it blindly and what came out was pretty cool looking! Most gig posters I’ve seen, and even ones I admire, seem to have been given zero to go on via the band. It’s more in the artists realm of just creating great imagery, I think. It’s like two worlds of art combining with no guidelines or direction and that can be awesome as well. Free reign. A lot of magic can happen when that’s the case.

 

igotbirds: Moving away from your branding and apparel work, how did it come about that you found yourself illustrating Film Posters?

Matt Tobin: I truly fell in love with poster design when I first gazed upon James Rheem DavisLost Boys” poster for Mondo. I somehow came across it and was trying to track it down so I could own it. Through my research I found out about Mondo and the underground world of alternative poster art. I was hooked. Film is also one of my biggest passions. Like I mentioned before, being younger I dipped my toes in everything. There was a point before the band where I was actually aiming to have a career in film. So yeah, I wanted so badly to create posters for films I love.

 

igotbirds: Let’s talk for a minute about your Poster for “True Romance”. It’s a really stunning poster and it appeals to me in the same way as a Tyler Stout poster, in that it features most of the major players in “True Romance” as Stout tends to do in a lot of his Film Poster illustrations. Can you talk about your thoughts behind the creation of the poster illustration and also the bold color palette you brought to it?

Matt Tobin: The True Romance poster was a big deal for me. It was my first officially licensed print. The cool thing was I already had a concept in mind before I was approached by the folks at Odd City. It was awesome to be able to bring to life a concept I had been aching to do. True Romance is one of my favourite films. I think the choice to portray every important character was a must. The abundance of talent and familiar faces in that film are astounding. Each character is memorable. Had to do ’em all! I really wanted to capture the films early ’90s feel with the colour palette. Bright and vivid. Pinks and turquoises. In the back of my head I always wanted to include some comic book and Japanese elements that are apparent in the movie too.

 

Matt Ryan Tobin-True Romance Variant Edition

Matt Ryan Tobin-True Romance Variant Edition

 

igotbirds: Keeping with the “True Romance” theme, the Poster was a HUGE success with Odd City, selling out very, very quickly. As artists we tend to work in solitude and maybe don’t realize how much our work impacts those around us. Does it ever come as a shock when you see how much demand there is for a very well-done piece such as “True Romance”?

Matt Tobin: Well, to be honest, I think I personally was desiring a True Romance print! The fact that I got the opportunity to create it myself was flattering…and nerve-wracking. I was beyond shocked when they sold out. I’m a new kid on the block and poster aficionados are very picky with who does what poster for what movie and how its executed. The fact that some of those people appreciated the poster enough to want it in their homes is incredible. Feels so rewarding.

 

Matt Ryan Tobin-Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six Variant Edition

Matt Ryan Tobin-Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six Variant Edition

 

igotbirds: I am an avid, voracious collector of comic books, and have been since the age of six. I always felt like the Comic Book world was MY World, and that the kids I went to school with and the people I interacted with outside of that world could never understand my love and passion for the art form. Then Hollywood came along, and while I do greatly enjoy the films, I feel like MY World has been snatched away from me and now Frat guys and jocks love Marvel and DC but in a much different way than I do. With the good side such as documentaries on the Scene cropping up and Mondo releases selling out in literally seconds, and the bad side which are the dreaded “poster flippers” on eBay, who I really feel could care less about the art and are only in it for profit, what are your thoughts on the exposure that the Gig and Film Poster Scenes are getting these days?

Matt Tobin: Well I think it’s like anything, man. Everyone has that one thing they love that feels sort of secret and special. I don’t care who you are, when that “thing” becomes popular it makes you angry. You’ve been appreciating it more and longer than everyone else. It’s yours. It’s your “thing”. But it happens with everything. Uncool inevitably becomes cool. I was a loser in grade school who read comics and didn’t socialize, and dressed different than most. Most of the things I love felt taken from me when I saw them first. However, looking at the grand scheme of things; the fact that all these new people are appreciating comic books and poster art are only concreting these things in pop culture as something to be cherished and noticed by everyone. I think we all can get a little hypocritical from time to time. I remember thinking everything mainstream was awful. Now the things I love are mainstream. I should appreciate it now, a lot less sucks than it did before.

 

Matt Ryan Tobin-They Love

Matt Ryan Tobin-They Love

 

igotbirds: Can you give us a hint about any upcoming projects you may be working on? Is there a “dream” project you would love to tackle?

Matt Tobin: I’m working on some gallery pieces right now for some rad shows at Hero Complex Gallery and other things I can’t really mention! As for a dream project…There’s so many things I would love to do. I know I’ve already created a poster for Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey a while back – but I feel it is owed a revisiting. I would love to do a Bill & Ted 1 & 2 set of posters.

 

Matt Ryan Tobin-Die Hard

Matt Ryan Tobin-Die Hard

 

Matt Ryan Tobin-Deadlights

Matt Ryan Tobin-Deadlights

igotbirds: Matt, can you tell people where to find you on the Internet? Facebook, Twitter, Website, etc…?

Matt Tobin: I’m all over the inter-webs!

We would like to thank Matt Tobin for being awesome and taking time to answer our questions. Please hit up the links featured in this interview, and please check out the work of Matt Tobin at www.worksofmattryan.com.

Mondo’s True Detective Drop.

Mondo is dropping a multitude of posters on Friday, February 14, 2014 for HBO’s “True Detective“.

Phantom City Creative-True Detective

Phantom City Creative-True Detective


Poster by Phantom City Creative. 18″x24″ screen print. Hand numbered. Edition of 220. Printed by Monolith Press. $45

Vania Zouravliov-True Detective

Vania Zouravliov-True Detective


Poster by Vania Zouravliov. 24″x36″ screen print. Hand numbered. Edition of 170. Printed by Monolith Press. $50

Vania Zouravliov-True Detective-Yellow Colorway

Vania Zouravliov-True Detective-Yellow Colorway


Poster by Vania Zouravliov. 24″x36″ screen print. Hand numbered. Edition of 170. Printed by Monolith Press. $50

Jay Shaw-True Detective-Woody Harrelson

Jay Shaw-True Detective-Woody Harrelson


Poster by Jay Shaw. 18″x24″ screen print. Hand numbered. Edition of 120. Printed by Monolith Press. $40

Jay Shaw-True Detective-Matthew McConaughey

Jay Shaw-True Detective-Matthew McConaughey


Poster by Jay Shaw. 18″x24″ screen print. Hand numbered. Edition of 120. Printed by Monolith Press. $40

This should be a great Valentine’s Day drop!

Big Changes At igotbirds.com

Hello All,

We would like to take this time to announce some major changes to igotbirds.com. From this point forward, igotbirds.com will be focusing almost exclusively on Artists and Illustrators involved in the Gig and Film Poster Scene. We’ve been able to secure some great interviews with some really talented people, and we hope to continue that tradition and make igotbirds.com a place that you’ll want to check out often. Quite recently, we decided a change was needed from the previous format, which encompassed all kinds of Blog postings, to a more focused Blog, and we have now taken that action.

In becoming a leaner, more art-centric Blog, my girlfriend and Blogging partner Nicole has migrated her Blog postings to a new domain at www.shesgotbirds.com. Construction on this new domain is far from finished, but for now that is where you will find her musings on Running, Training, Food, and general Weird things. If you have followed Nicole’s posts in the past, or are a new reader to igotbirds.com, I urge you to check out Nicole’s Blog as well.

Thanks so much to the readers who have liked our Blog postings, the super awesome illustrators and filmmakers we have spoken with, and Nicole for putting up with my crazed obsession with Gig and Film Poster illustrators and designers. We hope to make 2014 a banner year!

Sincerely,

Dave

New Releases From Kevin Tong & Tyler Stout.

Today brings us news of releases from two of the most sought after illustrators in the Poster Scene.

Kevin Tong - Hannibal

Kevin Tong – Hannibal


First up we have Kevin Tong’s poster for “Hannibal” featuring Will Graham’s “Spirit Animal”, as we like to think of it. The blood red background and spatters of red on the snow really create an eerie, surreal mood. We’re pretty excited for this drop on Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014 at Mondo’s website for $45.00 and is limited to an edition of 275.


Tyler Stout-Jimi Hendrix

Tyler Stout-Jimi Hendrix


Next up, we have Tyler Stout’s Jimi Hendrix piece for Dark Hall Mansion. This print will be released on Friday, Feb. 14, 2014 in a regular edition of 600 Standard prints for $65.00, and 200 Variant Edition prints for $110.00.

Here’s to hoping that everyone who wants one, gets one!


A Conversation With Paul Ainsworth.

The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou by Paul Ainsworth

The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou by Paul Ainsworth

 

Continuing with our venture to interview up-and-coming and established Film Poster illustrators, we have managed to score an interview with Canadian poster designer and illustrator, Paul Ainsworth. Paul was gracious enough to answer all of the questions we had for him, and we would like to thank Paul for his contribution to what we hope will become a regular part of igotbirds.com. We hope you enjoy a conversation with Paul Ainsworth.


igotbirds: Paul, can you tell our readers a little about yourself? Where you were raised, early life, etc…?

Paul Ainsworth: I’m an illustrator/Graphic Designer/husband/father of a 21 month old girl with a little one on the way come late May, residing just outside of Toronto, Ontario Canada. Born and raised in Timmins, Ontario, 8 hours North of here (Just google “Home of Shania Twain” and you’ll find us). Middle child of three kids, two of which including myself are gingers. Very supportive family. My mother worked for the Diocese and my Father retired as the Director of the Board of Education. Before all that he was my principal in High School. So that might answer the, “Why?” question haha.


igotbirds: What led you to study art and design/illustration? Have you always created art? Myself included, I know many artists/designers have always drawn/painted as far back as they can remember. Was this the case for you?

Paul Ainsworth: Of course! I remember the drawing that stood out for me. I think my mother still has it. It was one of those “What do you want to be when you’re grownup?” type things in grade 2 or 3. I wanted to be a Police Officer and I drew a cop walking beside a cop car. I remember my mother saying, “Boy he sure looks like he’s walking!”. Made me think, “Hmm, I can make things look like something!” so I just kept drawing whenever I got the chance. I have no intention of becoming a Police Officer. Funny enough, my younger brother is actually a Police officer back home so he has fulfilled my early childhood dream. Oh well!
How I really got into drawing was when I was younger my mother tried to get me to join some book clubs. I didn’t care for the books. Sure they had great covers, but I needed visuals. Every Sunday after Mass, my parents would stop at this corner store for ice-cream and I always went for the comic books. My parents were ok with my love for comics because it was reading. Sure, it wasn’t page after page of text, but there was a story. Like any kid reading comics who love the art, I started to copy the artwork. I would never trace, I would do still-life of what I was reading. By the time I was in Grade 7 I was hooked.

 

Paul Ainsworth "Pee-Wee's Big Adventure"

Paul Ainsworth “Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure”

 

igotbirds: How did you get involved with the whole Poster Art Scene? We have heard from many, many designers that it’s a very difficult scene to break into. Was it a tough road for you?

Paul Ainsworth: It’s still is a tough road. There’s a lot of sacrifice involved in this gig. Time from family, time away from doing paycheque work but there’s some great benefits to it all. You just really need to keep up and push yourself to keep/make a name for yourself. I’ve done a lot of all nighters trying to balance my daily work schedules with my poster work only because of that fear. The worst feeling is when you miss out on a show that everyone is talking about, even more so when you’ve actually put in the work and the work just isn’t up to par with what you think should be submitted.
Oh right!! How I got involved?! Sorry, I go on tangents. When I had an office job working on subject matter that I would never personally choose to do, I would daydream a little about dream projects or just stuff that I would do if I had the choice. I’m a huge film buff and at the time a lot of film posters of different styles were showing up on Google image searches left and right. Olly Moss, Shepard Fairey, and a slew of amazing artists were doing gig posters and alternative film posters and I just wanted to create some on my own. I originally created a poster for The Hunt for Red October. It wasn’t terribly great but it got me creating. I spoke to a Creative Director at one of the top advertising agencies in Canada about my book and he told me that I needed more Typography. He said, “Maybe pick a favourite movie or book and recreate the artwork typographically.” So I did a couple. He loved them. The “Beetlejuice” one still had a little bit of imagery that fed my illustration needs and really got me seriously thinking about poster art. Eventually I found a gallery that was showing a number of Artist and was really young in the world of poster art. I approached Joe Bouganim at Bottleneck Gallery in New York about getting involved and he loved how diverse my portfolio was. He wanted to see something that was more poster related and at the time, I just created my “Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure” piece and he loved it, so he added me to the list and from there on, it has been a life of networking, art community involvement, gallery shows, commissions and flat out fun for me.


igotbirds: What challenges have you faced in creating a print based on a film? Specifically, have you faced issues with film rights, print runs, etc…?

Paul Ainsworth: Can I answer “no comment” and just explain in an email? Haha! This industry, like all industries, have rules, regulations and suggestions. As long as you play nice and don’t step outside that thin red line, you’re golden. Unfortunately, like any other industry, once you step out of bounds there might be some flags on the field. It’s a learning process for a lot of us. I’ve dealt with a number of corporate and entertainment industries throughout my career, let alone in the Poster world, on a number of different issues and because my poster work is not my bread and butter, I play nice. Only in the recent couple of years, from what I have deducted, have the studios taken interest in our little community of artists and started giving us some taste of the big time. Actors and staff in the film industry all love what we do and don’t hold back on giving us the thumbs-up. “The suits” however are the ones that really care if we’re doing things the right way. It’s also “the suits” that will be the ones that give us the opportunity to do some big legitimate work. You can’t blame any of these folks for sticking to their guns and there’s really no sense in fighting it. I’ve heard of some artists really getting hit hard by these issues and it can get into some heavy shit, and really I can go on and on about this subject, but again, I’m still pretty new at all this, but I know the boundaries and I want to stay within them.

 

Paul Ainsworth "Back to The Future"

Paul Ainsworth “Back to The Future”

 

igotbirds: Your “Back To The Future” print is just awesome! Could you tell us a little about your process? Do you start out with hand drawn illustrations and then scan those into the computer to work in Illustrator/Photoshop?

Paul Ainsworth: First thing I do when I create a poster is watch the film. This is probably the best part of the process. Even if I’ve seen the movie a hundred times, I throw it in again and just get inspired. It’s easy to create a scene when creating sequential art (comics) because you have other frames and shots to support the flow of your storyline. In film posters, it all boils down to one shot. You have create interest in the viewer to want to see the film whether it’s for the first time, or to see it again. So I draw layouts as I watch. I do small thumbnail sketches and plan things out. Drew Struzan mentioned in a documentary that he studied for years on nailing down his technique and his ways of creating likeness, but only through film poster art did he realize that he has to learn how to turn over artwork as quick as possible with his signature, so that the studios can have their say in the process. Like many others in this industry, it’s my side work. I need to quickly do things so that my freelance work doesn’t get hindered or I’m not up all night worrying if Marty’s nose is “button” enough! So on the project or layout I’ve decided to go with I make sure the likeness is there first and foremost. So I find as much reference material as I can. I use Illustrator mostly when it comes to my work. Photoshop is brought in only to add effects if I’m not doing a screen print. If the project is worthy of a screen print (which is costly at times) I have to make sure every colour is set properly and all the traps don’t have issues. Sorry for the shop talk there. Screen printing is a science on it’s own and I am nowhere close to being as great as say a Chris Garofalo when it comes to screens, but I’m getting better. I even had a printer tell me I did 95% of his work. I was so proud of myself. I’ll get it to 100% soon I swear.

 

"Fargo" by Paul Ainsworth

“Fargo” by Paul Ainsworth

 

igotbirds: What artists/designers influence you? Are there designers in the Poster Art Scene whose work you really enjoy?

Paul Ainsworth:

Some folks whose work I love looking at and who keep me excited about doing this are Chris Garofalo, Matt Ferguson, Matt Tobin, Salvadore Anguiano, Sam Ho, PJ McQuade, Orlando Arocena and pretty much all of my fellow Poster Posse crew.

igotbirds: When you’re in the process of designing a Film Poster, what’s a typical work day like for you?

Paul Ainsworth: Well, because it’s not my actual work, it’s usually a nighttime thing. I won’t bore you with “Feed the little one before day care then off to the gym” stuff, but when I get to work on the poster stuff, I usually either put the movie I’m working on in and minimize it, or I listen to it’s soundtrack so that it’s constantly in my head and yea, just work away. Red eyes and all. I’m not a great coffee drinker. The crashes are hard to handle, so I try to eat well throughout the day to keep energy levels up. When it comes to the process, the layout and overall design is the hardest part of it all. Technique can be treated differently and I’m still in a discovery mode and try different things, but if the design isn’t right, I fold. I worked on a piece for Hero Complex Gallery recently really hard and it just wasn’t to snuff with what I usually do. I had great expectations and it fell short and it really bummed me out. Not only to be part of a great group, but for Adam who works hard to organize these events.

 

"The Neverending Story" by Paul Ainsworth

“The Neverending Story” by Paul Ainsworth

igotbirds: We saw you recently released a Poster based on “The Neverending Story“, which is a fabulous print, by the way. What other releases do you have in the pipeline? Is there a “dream” film you would love to design a poster for?

Paul Ainsworth: If I had the luxury of having all the time in the world and no worries of supporting my family with my day-to-day work, I would create works for titles like “InnerSpace”, “Backdraft”, “The Crow” and yeah…the list goes on. I love film and combining that with my love of illustrating and design is just fun. As far as other releases in the books, I have been invited by Gauntlet Gallery in San Francisco to join their show entitled “Daft Punk Deux” which was a huge success last year and I hope to bring something great to the table. Plus I’m a huge Daft Punk fan so that helps. I have one show with Hero Complex Gallery that I’m not sure if it has gone public yet, but I know the subject matter I’m going to be working on will be really fun. I’m not sure if I’m more excited about watching the movie a number of times, or doing the work. Either way, there are a number of gallery shows and who knows what else in store. Getting involved and continuously doing new work open doors all the time. I keep telling people when they don’t find opportunities that they have to create their own and something will definitely come of it.

 

"The Walking Dead" by Paul Ainsworth

“The Walking Dead” by Paul Ainsworth

 

Paul Ainsworth "Flight of The Navigator"

Paul Ainsworth “Flight of The Navigator”

 

Paul Ainsworth "Pacific Rim"

Paul Ainsworth “Pacific Rim”

 

Paul Ainsworth "Twenty-Four by Thirty-Six"

Paul Ainsworth “Twenty-Four by Thirty-Six”

 

igotbirds: Can you tell people where to find you online? Your Website, Twitter, Facebook…basically any area of the Web you want people to find you.

Paul Ainsworth:

Once again, we would like to thank Paul Ainsworth for taking the time out of his schedule to speak with us. Paul will be one of the many illustrators featured in Kevin Burke’s upcoming documentary “Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six“. Please be sure to click on the links in our interview and check out Paul’s work at www.paidesign.net!

Mondo’s Laurent Durieux Solo Show.

Back To The Future II variant by Laurent Durieux

Back To The Future II variant by Laurent Durieux


As some of you know, the Belgian illustrator Laurent Durieux is having his first solo showing at Mondo Gallery in Austin, TX tonight! Kevin Burke, the director of “Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six” is in Austin to film a chat with Durieux (and hopefully snag a few prints).

Durieux created a Back To The Future II print and variant edition for the show, amongst other works he will be exhibiting. The Durieux exhibit runs through March 1st, and we encourage anyone in the vicinity of 4115 Guadalupe Street in Austin, TX to check it out. It’s gonna be a great one!

The Birds by Laurent Durieux

The Birds by Laurent Durieux


Rear Window by Laurent Durieux

Rear Window by Laurent Durieux


Back To The Future II by Laurent Durieux

Back To The Future II by Laurent Durieux


The Wolf Man by Laurent Durieux

The Wolf Man by Laurent Durieux


The Master by Laurent Durieux

The Master by Laurent Durieux


King Kong by Laurent Durieux

King Kong by Laurent Durieux


Jaws by Laurent Durieux

Jaws by Laurent Durieux


Dracula by Laurent Durieux

Dracula by Laurent Durieux


A Conversation With Kevin Burke.

Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six

Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six

 

Kevin Burke

Kevin Burke

 

Very recently (as of yesterday, in fact) we had the opportunity to conduct an interview via email with none other than the Director of “Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six“, Kevin Burke. Kevin was gracious enough to take time out of his busy schedule in Toronto, Canada to answer the questions of self-proclaimed “Poster Art Fanboys”.

For those of you who are not regular visitors to the Blog, “Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six” is an upcoming film produced by Post No Joes Productions documenting the revival and increasing popularity of the illustrated poster art scene. Kevin, as the Director of the film, has had numerous interactions with Designers and Illustrators all over the world, and sat down to speak with us regarding the origins of the project and his love of illustrated film posters. Without further ado, I present to you A Conversation with Kevin Burke!

 

igotbirds: Kevin, tell us a little about yourself and your early life. Where you grew up, what kinds of things were you into as a youth?

Kevin Burke: I grew up in a medium-sized Canadian city right across the border from Detroit – Windsor, Ontario. I was into movies as far back as I can remember – not just the stories and the escapism, but the general movie-going experience. Which, back then, was very different than it is today. Movie theatres and video stores used to celebrate the movies, celebrate nostalgia for the art. There were murals in our local theatre of famous scenes from old westerns and paired portraits of golden age stars all over the walls. The local video stores were very much the same. My first job was in a locally owned video store and I loved it – no uniforms, no 2 for 1 candy upselling, no bullshit – just a bunch of people who loved the movies and wanted to be around them 24/7. Then that video store, and all the others in town were muscled out by Blockbuster and Rogers, and now video stores are all but dead entirely. The same culture shift happened with the cinemas though – they were all bought out or out-sold by multiplexes with 24 screens, coffee bars and arcades and synergistic, cross-promotional visa cards with movie points. It used to be about the movies, man. Talking about it now I feel kind of sad for kids who will never be able to experience that – because now it seems like it’s all about screaming commerce into everyone’s face, as loudly as possible, as soon as they open the multiplex doors. Alternatives are starting to pop up though. In Toronto we have The Royal Cinema, Underground Cinema and others. I’m happy that indie cinemas are making a comeback, at least in bigger cities. I hope it spreads.

 

igotbirds: How did you get interested/involved in the movie poster art scene?

Kevin Burke: When I was a kid I collected one-sheets. I used to get put on a waiting list at the cinema and video stores and they would call me when a poster came down out of a marquee. Then I’d beg my parents to drive me there, or I’d bike, to go and pick it up. My walls were covered with posters as a kid. I kind of drifted away from movie posters around the same time that posters started to stray away from illustration in favour of the cheaper, easier to market, photoshopped alternative. I’d love to say that I had the foresight to see that posters were becoming bland and that’s the reason I stopped collecting, but the truth is that I became a teenager, and like most teenagers I decided that I was way too cool for anything and everything. It was just good timing. Fast forward to 2010 when my fiancee buys me an Olly Moss “There Will be Blood” print from Mondo and I’m hooked again and led to question what happened to posters over those couple of decades.

There Will Be Blood - Olly Moss

There Will Be Blood – Olly Moss

 

igotbirds: What made you want to create a film about movie poster artists?

Kevin Burke: Being a collector, a filmmaker, and noticing that there’s this glaring hole where a movie about poster art should be. I had mulled around the idea for a little while and had settled on doing it after completing another project. Then one day, my fiancee (and co-producer) Andrea gets a call from this really awesome horror lecture series in Toronto called The Black Museum (Seriously, look them up. They’re incredible) and they ask her to do an academic lecture on the history of horror movie posters. Perfect, right? So, in talking about the evolution of the art she decides to talk a little about modern screenprints in the lecture – we get in touch with Gary Pullin, who everyone will tell you is one of the friendliest horror maniacs in the world, and ask to shoot an interview with him to include in the lecture. He says “Sure thing.”, we say “Rad!” and we shoot this great interview with one of our favourite artists. And that pretty much sealed the deal on moving forward with the film for me. I figured – if all of these people creating the art that I love are as cool and fun as Pullin then I’d be stupid not to move on this. And so far the poster art community has welcomed the film with open arms and been amazing to work with. I’ve made a lot of great friends.

Friday The 13th by Gary Pullin

Friday The 13th by Gary Pullin

igotbirds: Being a filmmaker, what aspects of the filmmaking process are most important to you in conveying the individual stories of the poster artists you have encountered during the making of “Twenty-Four by Thirty-Six”?

Kevin Burke: The most important thing, to me, is creating an insightful film about movie posters and how they’ve evolved. I also intend to try and answer the question of whether or not illustrated screenprints fill a void for fans left behind by studio key art straying away from illustration. A key component of this is, of course, the artists who create them. We intend to use interview footage with the artists, and insights from them, to tell the story. Now obviously we won’t be able to focus on everyone’s life story as much as we’d like (but if you can get me an audience with A&E to pitch a mini-series…ha), but we do want to explore what it’s like to live as an artist working in this industry. We want fans and viewers to have a human element to relate to, because no one wants to just see heads talking at them for 90 minutes. So we’re going to be placing a special focus on a select few artists, each at a different place in their career and personal life, and giving some insight into what it’s like to live as a poster artist. We’re also going to be doing some really rad compositing in order to bring some of these great illustrations to life with unique animation. We’re bringing our “A Game” to this flick.

 

igotbirds: On average, how much time do you get to spend interviewing the various artists for this film? What artists have been your favorite to interview so far and why?

Kevin Burke: Everyone is different, depending on the situation. I live in Toronto and I’ll likely have the opportunity to interview Phantom City Creative 2 or 3 times before the film is complete, so we may spend a great deal of time together. But during my first trip to Austin, one day we knocked out 5 interviews, back to back, over a span of 2 hours. I’ll be in Austin again next weekend to speak with Laurent Durieux – I plan to sit with him for an hour or so and just have a chat, whereas if we were shooting the interview at his home in Brussels we would be able to tour his collection, workspace, etc… like we have been able to with other artists. So, it’s always dependent on what we’re able to make work within everyone’s schedule and location. It’s a hugely ambitious project and we’re speaking with a ton of artists. We look to make the best out of every interview scenario. As far as favourites go – everyone has been really pleasant to interview. I’ve made a lot of really cool friends in putting this together. I just interviewed Matt Ryan Tobin and Paul Ainsworth this weekend and had a lot of fun. They’re both really funny dudes. I plan on drinking many beers with them before our Canadian soil thaws in the spring.

Kevin Burke with Paige Reynolds & Justin Erickson of Phantom City Creative

Kevin Burke with Paige Reynolds & Justin Erickson of Phantom City Creative

 

Kevin Burke with Matt Ryan Tobin

Kevin Burke with Matt Ryan Tobin

 

igotbirds: Who are your favorite poster artists to collect?

Kevin Burke: Yikes! There are so many. I love Ken Taylor’s stuff. I just scored one of his “Where the Wild Things Are” prints off of a Mondo drop, so I guess fate was on my side that day. I really love Tracie Ching’s stuff too, and I dig what she’s doing in Kickstarting print projects. I think that’s a really great way to get art projects off the ground. I snagged one of her “War of the Worlds” prints by supporting her campaign and I can’t wait for it to come in. Pullin, Phantom City and Jason Edmiston of course. The aforementioned Paul Ainsworth and Matt Ryan Tobin – what can I say? I’m not going to profess to be any kind of art critic, but I see both of these guys doing huge things over the next couple of years. I finally saw Paul’s “Back to the Future” print in person, for instance, and holy shit – no pic on the internet can do that thing justice. There really are too many favourites to name.

War of The Worlds by Tracie Ching

War of The Worlds by Tracie Ching

 

Halloween by Phantom City Creative

Halloween by Phantom City Creative

 

Die Hard by Matt Ryan Tobin

Die Hard by Matt Ryan Tobin

 

Paul Ainsworth "Back to The Future"

Paul Ainsworth “Back to The Future”

igotbirds: Can you give us a rundown of the equipment you’re using to produce this film? Camera equipment, mics, editing equipment, digital storage, etc…

Kevin Burke: Sure. I’m shooting on a Blackmagic Cinema Camera which gives me a ton of colour control in post, and the image quality is stunning. We use a couple of DSLRs and a Panasonic HMC-40 as back-ups. We run a Sennheiser ME66 shotgun mic into a Tascam DR-60 audio recorder for interviews, and mic the artists up with Sennheiser lavs when they’re giving us tours of their homes, workspaces, etc. I edit and do motion graphic compositing through Adobe Creative Suite on a 2013 iMac i7 and store footage on 12Tb of LaCie Thunderbolt drive(s). We’ve been shooting with steadicam gimbals, vests, dolly track, sliders, you name it. My favourite part of every shooting day is looking over the dailies. I’m very excited to really sit down to work on post in the summer/fall.

A Nightmare On Elm Street III:  Dream Warriors poster by Jason Edmiston

A Nightmare On Elm Street III: Dream Warriors poster by Jason Edmiston

igotbirds: Can you talk a little bit about Post No Joes Productions? Your role in the company, what you’re looking forward to produce next, etc…

Kevin Burke: Post No Joes actually began as a little comedy sketch video troupe that me and my friends Richard Chan and Vance Gillis put together after college. We would get together and have meetings about conceptualizing shorts, run writing exercises, shoot some ad libbed stuff. Anything that we could do to keep working on film related projects to get practice and stay current. Post No Joes ended up creating commercial ads, music videos and gigs of that sort for clients and last year we co-produced our first documentary feature which ended up being picked up by The Documentary Channel here in Canada. Richard is co-producing Twenty-Four by Thirty-Six and working as Assistant Director. He’s a very active member of Post No Joes and we work on everything together. Vance is now living in Montreal knocking people dead on the improv and sketch comedy circuit – and I’m going to keep hassling him to write a narrative comedy for Post No Joes to produce until one of us dies/kills of frustration. We have a lot of ideas in the pipe to follow Twenty-Four by Thirty-Six, but as it stands it is our primary and daily focus. I’d love to produce a doc about the elderly Japanese citizens who volunteered to clean up the wreckage after the Fukushima disaster knowing they would die. They volunteered their lives to save younger citizens. Those sorts of stories are always really touching to me. We’re also working on a short subject doc about “Le Nain Rouge”, the historical Detroit urban legend of the little red demon that has been sighted at disasters in the motor city. And yeah – narrative comedy and horror. One day.

Kevin Burke outdoors

Kevin Burke outdoors

 

Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six by Paul Ainsworth

Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six by Paul Ainsworth

 

We here at igotbirds.com would like to thank Kevin Burke for taking time to speak with us. You can follow Kevin on Twitter, as well as Post No Joes. Be sure to visit the links featured in our interview and be on the lookout for “Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six” in the Fall of 2014!