Todd Slater for Primus.


That most 80’s of villains and all-around amazing illustrator, Todd Slater, brings us his latest gig poster for Primus, who happen to be playing in Cooperstown, NY tonight!

Primus - Cooperstown, NY Gig Poster by Todd Slater

Primus – Cooperstown, NY Gig Poster by Todd Slater

Here’s what Primus had to say regarding Todd’s print…”Tonight’s 6 -Color silkscreen by renowned Rock Poster Artist Todd Slater will be available at the merch booth during the Brewery Ommegang show in New York. 200 pre-tubed artist signed copies + some band signed copies will be for sale. Get there early and snag a copy before they’re history.

Head over to the Primus Tour Page, and snag some tickets for the show, and while you’re browsing the interwebs hit up Todd’s website for more illustrative goodness!

So if you happen to be in the Cooperstown, NY area tonight…well, you know what to do!


The Art of Laurie Greasley

Laurie Greasley, an illustrator residing in France has some pretty awesome work to share. I’m a huge Batman fan, so I’m partial to Laurie’s Batman illustrations!

Blade Runner Nexus VIII by Laurie Greasley

Blade Runner Nexus VIII by Laurie Greasley

Batman by Laurie Greasley

Batman by Laurie Greasley

Batman 75th Anniversary by Laurie Greasley

Batman 75th Anniversary by Laurie Greasley

Star Wars Episode 7 by Laurie Greasley

Star Wars Episode 7 by Laurie Greasley

Alien by Laurie Greasley

Alien by Laurie Greasley

Akira by Laurie Greasley

Akira by Laurie Greasley

Guzu Gallery Presents Deep Cuts 2

Pretty Hate Machine by Sal Gabriel

Pretty Hate Machine by Sal Gabriel

Austin’s own Guzu Gallery has some killer work available in their online store for their current show, Deep Cuts 2. This show celebrates Austin’s musical roots by showcasing some amazing illustrations by some of today’s best talent!

The show will be up for viewing until October 25th, but you can always view the work online if you can’t make it down to Austin.

Walk In Silence by Eric Torres : Half Human

Walk In Silence by Eric Torres / Half Human

Waiting in the Sky by Alan Defibaugh

Waiting in the Sky by Alan Defibaugh

Samurai Punk Uncut by Devin Lawson

Samurai Punk Uncut by Devin Lawson

MONDOCON 1: The First Day

As my buddy and I drove up to the Marchesa Hall in Austin, Texas, we immediately knew that MONDOCON 1 would be something special. Unfortunately for us, so did thousands of other fans. The venue was to open at 10:00 AM and we arrived just after 9:30 AM. Big mistake. The line was long, and “long” doesn’t quite paint the picture of just how many people were already in the line at this point. That’s what Mondo creates though. They are the big pioneer for this community, and everyone wants to be a part of it.

I didn’t end up getting into the actual Hall until about 10:30 AM, and immediately it was chaos. Easily over a thousand people were in a relatively small location all hunting down their most coveted print. There were 2 separate rooms filled with artists all along the walls as well as in the middle of the show floors. The room that Mike Mitchell was in was the most crowded because of his booth and his extremely slow moving line, and unfortunately this caused that entire hall to be packed line a can of sardines in some places (it stayed like that until I left for the nigth). Luckily, I had a ticket to The Art of Toy Making panel that started at 11:00 AM to get me out of the stress filled mad house.

This was a very interesting panel. I know nothing of the collectible toy world, so I’m sure other people enjoyed it a lot more. However, it was very awesome to hear about the creative and designing processes involved. Justin Ishmael, head honcho of Mondo, announced that the Iron Giant figure would be coming out around November, Hitchcock and Ninja Turtles in 2015, and newly announced Hellboy and Scott Pilgrim are in the works as well. If you are a collector of toys, Mondo is definitely the company to follow for upcoming releases. These people are collectors, they know what works, know what doesn’t, and made a big deal about how they don’t want to ruin the trust we have for them. They were also very open to fan comments on what you want, what needs to be fixed, etc., so if you have an opinion then they definitely want you to voice it.

As I walked back into the main lobby from the panel, the lines were even longer at this point. To get into the outdoors Mondo tent line, there was a line. To get into one of the two halls, there was a waiting line. If you wanted to get art, there was a line. This gave me a chance to first get a “Strawberry Cornetto” Shaun of the Dead inspired beverage, and then check out some other names I had not been familiar with before in the at-less-than-capacity hall that I hadn’t venture into yet.  This is where I really started to enjoy the magic that Mondo had envisioned for this convention. I was able to explore this huge community of art, meet other fans just as passionate as me, and just stand in awe. I feel like that is something that could easily have been lost among the people there, is just how awesome it all really was. But long lines, heat, rain, and small print runs will do that.

As the day went on, I began to enjoy my time there a lot more. Honestly, it seemed like everyone was. It definitely thinned out, and you were able to relax more. I learned about Dave Correia (of Zero Friends), got to chat with Jock and Jason Edmiston, threw (and missed) records at Zombies while trying to earn a variant copy of the Shaun of the Dead record, and met tons of cool people. Talking to all of you who love this stuff as much as me was probably my favorite thing so far too. Being able to share passion, introduce others (or be introduced) to new artists, and create memories is what is going to make MONDOCON something great.

The Mondo tent was, in my opinion, not as strong as a lot of art inside. They had tons of Iron Giant stuff (which I was OK with), Deadpool/ Night of the Living Dead mash ups, and a few other movie titles that I wasn’t very familiar with. All of the quality was top notch though, as always with prints from Rich Kelly, Franceso Francavilla, DKNG, Mike Mitchell, Jason Edmiston, and so many more. They introduced vinyl records for Looper and Iron Giant as well.

Overall, there are many things to like about MONDOCON. There was great art, very nice people and artists everywhere, great food and drinks, and new people to fall in love with their work. There were also many things to not like about it such as LONG lines everywhere, a small venue, and a lack of expectation on Mondo’s part of how big this would be for the fans. I plan on going tomorrow more to just look around, see another panel, and get Sunday exclusive art. As of now, I’d say MONDOCON was a success. You just have to be able to adapt in this screen printed environment.

Another small thing to note was that there were panels going on all day, but those were tough to get tickets for. So far, there was a panel for the process of making a movie (from the art side), a 2001: A Space Odyssey vinyl release with clips shown from the movie, as well as the toy one I went to. Screenings tonight, which include prints in the ticket cost, are for Ghost in the Shell and Total Recall.

If someone from Mondo ever reads this, here are my  biggest recommendations: get a bigger venue, and let volunteers handle payment, not the artists. Let them enjoy the fan interaction, not the business side. Also, if you want this to exist with Fantastic Fest, don’t have it set as the same time as the movie festival. My $.02

More to come tomorrow at Day 2!

 

Jacob Triska

A Conversation With Conor Nolan!

Fallen Hero by Conor Nolan

Fallen Hero by Conor Nolan

Conor Nolan is one of those illustrators who just grabs your attention. He certainly did mine when I noticed his work a few days ago on Instagram. With heavy influences of Jack Kirby, rock bands, skulls and astronauts, Conor is poised to blow up on the scene very, very soon. I had a chance to briefly chat with Conor about his early life, his influences and his process. And now…A Conversation with Conor Nolan!

I Got Birds: Conor, can you tell the readers of the Blog a little bit about yourself, childhood, education, etc…?

Conor Nolan: I was born in Connecticut and moved with my family to Massachusetts when I was ten. Eventually, when time came for me to go to college I ended up in Brooklyn, New York attending Pratt Institute. I graduated in 2012 with a bachelors in illustration and I’ve lived there ever since. My dad works for a health insurance agency and is a beekeeper. My mom is a sign language interpreter for hospitals and medical settings. I have an older brother and sister and three nephews and one niece, all of whom I adore being an uncle to. My girlfriend and I have a dog named Sophie who we recently adopted and is my studio mate. If I’m not drawing or working on illustration I enjoy reading, collecting records, and being in nature which can be hard to come by in New York City.

Wolfman Skater by Conor Nolan

Wolfman Skater by Conor Nolan

I Got Birds: What led you down the path to become an illustrator?

Conor Nolan: Not that this was the “bing bang” moment of my realization that I wanted to become an illustrator but both my parent had, at one time, dabbled in being artists and had been really skilled at their craft. When I started to show interest in art they were very supportive and pushed me to explore my strengths. If I had to boil it all down to one moment though it was the first time I saw Star Wars as a child. I had never seen story telling like that, it was both imaginative and seamless, something that inspired me to want to tell stories of my own. I, of course, didn’t realize that at the time as all I wanted to do was draw aliens and star ships but it was a starting point. What followed was my obsession with comic books. My first comic I ever read was Donald Duck, then Mickey Mouse, then Superman, Transformers and then Terminator in that order. To say they left a lasting impression on me is an understatement. The memory of getting my driver’s license or the first time I tied my shoes have faded but I still remember reading Watchmen for the first time or The Killing Joke and any other number of classics. The comics I read moved me and I slowly started to develop a need to tell stories of my own through the only thing that I really felt I excelled in which was art.

Cosmonaut in Space by Conor Nolan

Cosmonaut in Space by Conor Nolan

I Got Birds: Your work looks pretty heavily influenced by comic book artists such as Jack Kirby and Moebius. Would you say there is a certain amount of comic book artistry as direct inspiration for your style?

Conor Nolan: The influence of comic art in my own work had a rise and fall with a direct correlation to my education. It existed pre-college but during my time at Pratt I was made aware of illustrators like N.C. Wyeth, J.C. Leyendecker, Alphonse Mucha, the entire Brandywine School and many others. Their art became a central point of inspiration for me and still largely is. The aspects of comic art influence you see in my work is more of a recent resurgence. It is, in some ways, an attempt to combine two loves into one hybrid of classical illustration with the aesthetics and energy you find in comics. Jack Kirby and Moebius are major influences for me but also Paul Pope, Leinil Francis Yu, Dave Gibbons, Mike Mignola, Frank Miller, to name a few.

The Sword by Conor Nolan

The Sword by Conor Nolan

I Got Birds: Can you talk a little about your process? So you start out sketching and then finalize your ideas digitally? What software, if any, do you utilize in your process?

Conor Nolan: My process, for the main part, is largely traditional. I’m a believer in the idea that your sketches should be well thought out and rendered as they provide the road map for your final. The more finished your sketches are the quicker and easier you’ll produce a final image. From there I will develop a significantly larger drawing with pencil. After that is complete I will shoot that drawing through a light box onto a fresh piece of Bristol paper where I will lay down my ink work. For my inks I use brushes ranging in a number of sizes. Once the inking is complete I will scan the drawing and bring it into Photoshop to color. This process is usually repeated as many of my drawings have layers that I do traditionally as well through the means of my light box. These layers are often the shadows and highlights. For every drawing you see of mine there are usually three or more drawings that have gone into it.

Hellraiser by Conor Nolan

Hellraiser by Conor Nolan

I Got Birds: What kinds of clients have you worked for, and is there a dream client that you would love to create for?

Conor Nolan: Clients I’ve worked for have been wide and varied. I’ve worked for breweries doing label and packaging illustration, one brewery being Three Floyds Brewery in Indiana. I’ve done work for bands, Coheed and Cambria, The Sword, This Good Robot, Shooting Guns, etc. I’ve done editorial illustration for Canada’s The Globe and Mail newspaper. I’m currently wrapping up my first comic cover run for Boom! Studios on their new series Hellraiser; Bestiary. I’ve worked with Spoke Art Gallery and Hero Complex Gallery for gallery shows. I’ve also just wrapped up a job for MTV which is exciting.  A dream client for me is tough because there are just so many things I want to do. The child in me is screaming to do something Muppet related because I’ve always been a fan of Jim Henson’s work. If I where to be asked to do a cover for Marvel or Dark Horse I wouldn’t mind. Ultimately I’d like to self publish but I think that day is far off.

Coheed and Cambria by Conor Nolan

Coheed and Cambria by Conor Nolan

I Got Birds: As you know, I Got Birds is primarily dedicated to the Film Poster Scene. Is Film Poster Illustration an area that you would want to explore in the future, and if so what are the inherent challenges that you could see in producing work for a Film property?

Conor Nolan: I’d would love to do a film poster, largely because I live in NYC and the subway is lined with “cookie cutter” movie posters that are boring and just highlight the celebrities acting in the film rather then the actual story. I’ve long held the ideology that if illustrators and artists were hired to do movie posters people would get more excited about them and in turn, pay for a ticket to see it. I’d also like to explore film poster illustration because aside from books, comics and other art, film has been a source of inspiration for me as well. I think an inherent challenge for producing work for a film property really comes down to style and aesthetics. There are some artists whose style could never portray the tenderness of Studio Ghibli’s “My Neighbor Totoro” or the epic wonderment of “The Fall”. For film poster illustration you have to represent one artistic voice with another and if one is a scream it shouldn’t be represented with a whisper.

The Lady of The Lake by Conor Nolan

The Lady of The Lake by Conor Nolan

I Got Birds: In closing, Conor, can you please tell our readers where they can find you online and anything you would like to plug?

Conor Nolan: You can see my full portfolio at www.conornolan.com. I usually give daily updates on my work and process on my Instagram which you can find here: http://instagram.com/nolanillustration . I also have a Tumblr and Twitter as well:

Tumblr: http://conornolanart.tumblr.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/conor_draws

Dracula Skater by Conor Nolan

Dracula Skater by Conor Nolan

HUGE thanks to Conor Nolan for taking time out of his ever-busy schedule to chat. We here at I Got Birds expect to see an ever-expanding portfolio of awesome pieces from Conor in the near future. Please follow his work on Instagram, Twitter, and Tumblr!


Video Clips From Blurppy’s “Batman 75” Project!


A few months ago I was asked to participate in a top-secret project organized by Blurppy. The project was an illustrated celebration of the last 75 years of Batman. Needless to say, being the HUGE fanboy that I am, this was quite the honor.

I got to work coming up with my illustration, and finishing just days before the project was due. After finishing the illustration, and sending it off to Blurppy, I just didn’t feel satisfied. I felt there was more work that needed to be done in celebration of The Dark Knight. Once I saw all of the wonderful illustrations from the likes of The Poster Posse and special guest artists, I knew what I had to do. I had to create video clips in honor of all the talent present for the project. Enclosed in this Blog posting are the video clips in order from Phase One to Phase Five. I hope you enjoy them as much as I enjoyed creating them! You can see all the wonderful illustrations over at Blurppy.com.

Batman by David Brener

Batman by David Brener

Simon Delart Rocks The Vinyl.

Simon Delart, an illustrator out of Paris, France and a member of Poster Posse has created some wonderful conceptual art for movie soundtrack album covers! We wanted to feature some of the conceptual album cover art that Simon created as well as some awesome illustrations he has created for properties like “True Detective” and “X-Men: Days of Future Past”. Great work from yet another great illustrator!

Blade Runner by Simon Delart

Blade Runner by Simon Delart

Conan The Barbarian by Simon Delart

Conan The Barbarian by Simon Delart

Edward Scissorhands by Simon Delart

Edward Scissorhands by Simon Delart

Inception by Simon Delart

Inception by Simon Delart

Jurassic Park by Simon Delart

Jurassic Park by Simon Delart

Moon by Simon Delart

Moon by Simon Delart

Star Trek by Simon Delart

Star Trek by Simon Delart

Star Wars by Simon Delart

Star Wars by Simon Delart

Terminator 2 by Simon Delart

Terminator 2 by Simon Delart

The Lord of The Rings by Simon Delart

The Lord of The Rings by Simon Delart

Tron by Simon Delart

Tron by Simon Delart

True Detective by Simon Delart

True Detective by Simon Delart

X-Men Days of Future Past by Simon Delart

X-Men Days of Future Past by Simon Delart

You can find more work from Simon at the following links:

Salvador Anguiano, Once Upon A Time In Mexico.

 

Salvador Anguiano. Master of vectors, contributing member of Poster Posse, and super talented illustrator.

We had the opportunity to conduct a Q&A with Salvador from his home in Mexico, and the results are stunning. I can honestly say that it’s one of the most in-depth interviews we have conducted thus far. Salvador not only touches on his background in art and design but also gives us a look into living and working as an artist in a country that has such rich culture, yet has been wracked with violence and economic stagnation.

We hope you enjoy this wonderful interview and we thank Salvador for taking time away from his busy schedule to chat with us. Now, without further ado…A Conversation with Salvador Anguiano!

I Got Birds: Salvador, could you give our readers a bit of background information about yourself? How did you first become interested in art and illustration?

Salvador Anguiano: I’ve always loved drawing, ever since I was quite little. My mom had to work all day and I would end up alone, locked up in our house with just the TV, comics, pencil and paper to pass time ’til she would come back late at night… so it was only natural, I guess. I studied Graphic Design because I wanted to draw comics, but as time passed I actually got into graphic design and stopped drawing except for the occasional project here and there. I got way into logo design and typography. Pretty soon letters were all I’d be drawing.

Three O' Clock High by Salvador Anguiano

Three O’ Clock High by Salvador Anguiano

I Got Birds:What drew you to illustrate for Film Posters? Do you have a favorite illustration you have created based on a film?

Salvador Anguiano: I was getting burned out by work, dealing with changes, chasing payments…All the “work” stuff, not design in itself. I realized I didn’t want to do that for my entire life, so I decided I would work my ass off for a year, taking every job that came my way no matter what, and save up every cent so I could set a good side business and remove my practice as the main source of income. I managed to make a decent amount of money in that year, and while I did some fun stuff, it was mostly stuff done for money and it helped me realize I was no longer into it. My tank was empty but we had enough money in the bank to start a business and plan my next move.

Then one day I’m watching Adventure Time with my kid and it’s freaking awesome! My kid asks if I can draw Finn and Jake for him and I said, “Sure, let me give it a try” I ended up doing an Adventure Time poster for him, he loved it. Then my wife told me about this other show that she and our kid used to watch, Regular Show. I started watching it and it was hilarious, full of 80s references. My wife asked me for a drawing of Mordecai and Rigby and I did it for her, again it was awesome and she loved it so much. I was doing stuff I loved for people I loved and they loved what I was doing, so I thought I should be looking for love not money. Sounds easy to figure that out but sometimes it’s not. I decided to start doing stuff that made me feel happy-happy, joy-joy

I talked to my wife and we agreed that I’d get a year to just have fun, to go back to drawing and illustration. If nothing came out of it then I’d go back to regular design stuff and no harm done. So I started illustrating some Masters of the Universe things like that and they got me some followers and people began looking and liking my stuff. Then some Canadian wacko started talking to me on Instagram and Behance, you may know him as “Paul Ainsworth“, he introduced me to this alternative movie poster scene and I kind of liked it, so I tried my hand with some movies like 3 O’clock High, a movie my wife really loves, then The Karate Kid and I just kept at it.

Sweep The Leg Johnny by Salvador Anguiano

Sweep The Leg Johnny by Salvador Anguiano

As for my favorite piece maybe it would have to be the John Lawrence poster, just because Patton Oswalt retweeted that thing and it made its way to the one true hero of the 80’s William Zabka, which led to some cool exchanges with him.

Daft Punk by Salvador Anguiano

Daft Punk by Salvador Anguiano

Daft Punk detail 001 by Salvador Anguiano

Daft Punk detail 001 by Salvador Anguiano

Daft Punk detail 002 by Salvador Anguiano

Daft Punk detail 002 by Salvador Anguiano

I Got Birds:I love the Daft Punk illustration you recently created.  Can you talk about your process in creating that piece?

Salvador Anguiano: Thanks man, glad you liked it! That one came to be because of my kid, he’s 11 now (we had him when we were way young) and he’s starting to get into music, but it has to be music that relates to stuff he likes. So one day he sees Daft Punk on YouTube, and it’s robots playing music! So he goes nuts over them and asks me to do a poster of them, so I did it.

As for my process in creating that piece, I did some sketches and showed them to the little guy, until we came up with an idea we both liked. I wanted to have Guy Manuel and Thomas Bangalter in separate posters, but have the two pieces work together as one. I looked for a bunch of reference for the helmets, eventually I found some blueprints jpegs to build the helmets and that helped a lot with the basic line work. The background and the bodies were always going to be very subtle elements. After that I wanted the helmets to be the focus of the posters so I spent a lot of time working on them. I wanted them to look very metallic, to really shine.

In the end I think the posters work in that you get a very dark, subtle environment working around the helmets, which are pretty elaborate.

Now we, my kid and I, are thinking about doing variants like Tron version and a white suits version.

X-Men by Salvador Anguiano

X-Men by Salvador Anguiano

X-Men Days of Future Past by Salvador Anguiano

X-Men Days of Future Past by Salvador Anguiano

I Got Birds:Can you talk a little about the work you have created as part of Poster Posse, for X-Men: Days of Future Past?  I really love the Wolverine illustration you created as part of that project.

Salvador Anguiano: Thanks! Personally I like the Sentinel poster better, just because I gave it a very conscious effort to come up with a strong concept. You know, the Sentinels as harbingers of death for the mutants, and the tarot theme as a way to play with fate.

That Wolverine poster seems to have gotten a bit of attention, I mean, the guy IS the face of the X-Men. That piece was actually kind of an afterthought because I finished the Sentinel piece pretty early and I had a lot of free time on my hands, so I wanted to take a shot at drawing Wolverine. Once I finished, it was just… there. I had no idea what to do with him. I tried to make him like a mascot for a sports team but that didn’t work. Then I came across some old flyers for a concert room in Mexico city, and they had this awesome vintage look that I felt worked very well with the Wolverine illustration, so I went with that style. It was really just an experimentation piece, just me fooling around with stuff until something kind of clicked.

Captain America by Salvador Anguiano

Captain America by Salvador Anguiano

Captain America 002 by Salvador Anguiano

Captain America 002 by Salvador Anguiano

Captain America 003 by Salvador Anguiano

Captain America 003 by Salvador Anguiano

I Got Birds: Your work for Captain America: The Winter Soldier has a very 1960’s Pop Art feel to it.  Was Pop Art a major influence on these pieces?

Salvador Anguiano: Yes, definitely. I do like to study those movements, Bauhaus, Pop Art, Art Nouveau, Minimalism. I don’t always succeed in incorporating those influences but I do enjoy reading and looking at those different periods in the history of art. I also wanted to pay a little tribute to Malika Favre, whose work is obviously inspired by that movement.

As for the specific pieces, The one with Black Widow and Cap was a tribute to Malika Favre, like I mentioned before, she’s an awesome artist and she’s a big inspiration for me, I just wanted to create a piece that captured the romanticism in her work, nothing more to it.

The one with Cap’s shield, that was me definitely studying that style and the trailers, trying hard to come up with something solid. I wanted to make a very simple poster with a strong concept that captured what I was seeing in the trailer, and what I saw, at the most basic level, was a lot of chasing and speed. I wanted to communicate that excitement and urgency. All the movement the movie seemed to have. So I went with the most basic representation of movement, straight lines, and the most recognizable part of Captain America, his shield. In the end I liked the result and I think it holds up pretty well now that the movie has come out.

The third one, that was just Cap, nothing clever about it, haha!

I Got Birds:What decisions do you make as an artist when illustrating a poster for a film?

Salvador Anguiano: First of all is getting a grasp on the film you’re working on, and then you need to choose an idea that captures the theme of the film. Then it’s deciding what style you want to use to bring life to that concept. I always use vectors because I like the level of control you get working in Illustrator and I still don’t feel like I have a firm grasp on the style. Then it’s just knowing what level of detail I want to go for in the illustration. I usually keep it pretty simple because I got used to designing logos and fonts, and that’s the way I build my posters. Lately I’ve been trying to get away from that but like I said, I’m still developing my skills so everything is experimentation right now. Sometimes it’s a hit, sometimes it’s a miss.

I Got Birds: You live and work in Mexico.  In your opinion, how different is the illustration scene in Mexico from the United States, and how do you see the reaction of a US audience for your work as opposed to other parts of the world?

Salvador Anguiano: That’s a hard one to answer. For starters it is just a very different culture. People go about their work in a very different way. This tribute art scene is almost non-existent down here. We live in a pretty dire economic situation here, so people often prefer to use their time to try and get just a fair paycheck so they can make ends meet.

The design/illustration scene down here is a very different kind of beast. I think because of the extreme violence, ultra-dangerous crime and the awful economic situation we live in everyday down here people kind of take themselves way too seriously. And maybe that’s the reason why my work has been more appreciated outside of this country. US/Canada guys have been very welcoming of my efforts, I’ve made some really great friends, who are always willing to give support.

This is a great question, and it’s gonna keep me thinking for a while.

Batman by Salvador Anguiano

Batman by Salvador Anguiano

I Got Birds:Do you have a dream project that you’re itching to work on?

Salvador Anguiano: If you mean on a personal project, I want to do Superman! He’s my favorite character ever and I could go on and on about why that is. I want to make a great Man of Steel poster because that movie was awesome. But I don’t think I’m there yet where I could make something that matches my level of love for the character and the movie.

As for a “real job”…a paid project…well I’m still working on getting my skills on a level where I feel I can compete with the big guys, so I’m really just enjoying that journey and whatever comes my way because of it. It’s a dream project.

Wild Angels by Salvador Anguiano

Wild Angels by Salvador Anguiano

I Got Birds:Can you give us a hint about any upcoming projects you may be working on?

Salvador Anguiano: Just personal stuff right now, I’ve just finished my first piece for a gallery show, Kings of Cult at Hero Complex Gallery and soon I’ll start working on the next one, so that’s cool. I’m working on a personal Boba Fett piece but that’s still very raw, and well, there’s always the next Poster Posse project!

There’s a couple of “official” projects, but it’s still pretty early to talk about them.

47 Ronin for Poster Posse by Salvador Anguiano

47 Ronin for Poster Posse by Salvador Anguiano

47 Ronin by Salvador Anguiano

47 Ronin by Salvador Anguiano

I Got Birds: Finally, would you like to promote any upcoming projects, your website, where people can find you on social networking?

Salvador Anguiano:

  • I use Behance as my main portfolio site: be.net/salvador
  • You can always get a taste of my newest stuff in Instagram, lots of WIP shots, so you can look me up in there as: @hiperactivo
  • I’m trying to be more active over at Twitter, so look me up over there also as: @hiperactivo
  • And if you want to read my ramblings and rants then Facebook is the place: facebook.com/salvadoranguianodg


We can’t thank Salvador enough for taking time to speak with us. Please check out his work at the links listed above and give him a follow on Twitter and Instagram!

He-Man by Salvador Anguiano

He-Man by Salvador Anguiano

Skeletor by Salvador Anguiano

Skeletor by Salvador Anguiano

Battle Damaged Transformers by Salvador Anguiano

Battle Damaged Transformers by Salvador Anguiano

Optimus Prime by Salvador Anguiano

Optimus Prime by Salvador Anguiano

Decepticon Logo by Salvador Anguiano

Decepticon Logo by Salvador Anguiano

Point Break by Salvador Anguiano

Point Break by Salvador Anguiano