Top 15 of 2014!

A New Year is upon us, and with that comes the First Annual I Got Birds Top 15 Posters of 2014! We thought about making a Top 10 but then said “Screw it, we’re going bigger“! So, without further ado, here are our…

Top 15 of 2014!

15. “The Rock” by Patrick Connan

The Rock (green variant) by Patrick Connan

The Rock (green variant) by Patrick Connan

Goodspeed, Godspeed, Godhead…We don’t care what his last name is! Patrick Connan captures the essence of this quintessential Michael Bay film, and we love this print!


14. “Nightbreed” by Chris Garofalo

Nightbreed by Quiltface Studios

Nightbreed by Quiltface Studios

Chris Garofalo scares us half to death with his take on Dr. Decker, the infamous button-faced serial killer of Clive Barker’s “Nightbreed”!


13. “The Yellow-Haired Warrior” by Tracie Ching

Kill Bill - The Yellow Haired Warrior by Tracie Ching

Kill Bill – The Yellow Haired Warrior by Tracie Ching

What else can be said about this amazing poster from Tracie Ching? Just plain awesome, and the variety of “blood” spatters on each print make them truly one-of-a-kind!


12. “Starlord Dia De Los Muertos” by Orlando Arocena

Starlord Dia De Los Muertos by Orlando Arocena

Starlord Dia De Los Muertos by Orlando Arocena

Orlando Arocena pays tribute to his cultural heritage AND the Legendary Star-Lord (WHO???) in this great poster for “Guardians of The Galaxy”!


11. “The Shining” by Matthew Griffin

The Shining by Matthew Griffin

The Shining by Matthew Griffin

Matthew Griffin has really proven himself as an illustrator to watch with his beautiful piece for Stanley Kubrick’s “The Shining”!


10. “Sweep The Leg, Johnny” by Salvador Anguiano

Sweep The Leg Johnny by Salvador Anguiano

Sweep The Leg Johnny by Salvador Anguiano

Salvador Anguiano captures the majesty that is the greatest film antagonist of the 1980’s…Johnny from “The Karate Kid”!


9. “Ghost in The Shell” by Martin Ansin

Ghost In The Shell by Martin Ansin

Ghost In The Shell by Martin Ansin

Martin Ansin makes me want to travel to Tokyo and become a cyborg in his wonderful poster for “Ghost in The Shell”!


8. “Death Has Come To Your Little Town” By Matt Ryan Tobin

Death Has Come To Your Little Town By Matt Ryan Tobin

Death Has Come To Your Little Town By Matt Ryan Tobin

For those who think that the Ken Taylor or Jock “Halloween” posters are the ONLY ones to own, think again! Matt Tobin crushes it with his take on the “Halloween” mythos. Michael Myers is well-represented in his poster!


7. “The Terminator” by Gabz

The Terminator by Gabz | Regular Edition

The Terminator by Gabz | Regular Edition

Gabz super-detailed illustration of Cyberdyne Systems Model 101 makes this a must-have in our book! Now if only we could find Sarah Connor…Well, better start knocking on some doors…


6. “Where The Wild Things Are” by Ken Taylor

Where The Wild Things Are by Ken Taylor

Where The Wild Things Are by Ken Taylor

Nothing says nostalgia more than Ken Taylor’s beautiful illustration for “Where The Wild Things Are”!


5. “I Do Not Kill With My Gun” by The Dark Inker

I Do Not Kill With My Gun by The Dark Inker

I Do Not Kill With My Gun by The Dark Inker

The world of The Dark Tower is brought to life with this small, quiet illustration from The Dark Inker!


4. “Dr. Manhattan” by Kevin Tong

Dr. Manhattan by Kevin Tong

Dr. Manhattan (Variant) by Kevin Tong

Much like a series of comic book panels, Kevin Tong brings us the tragic story of Dr. Manhattan in a series of classic images from “Watchmen”!


3. “Rosemary’s Baby” by Lastleaf Printing

Rosemary's Baby by Lastleaf Printing

Rosemary’s Baby by Lastleaf Printing

We think Lastleaf Printing may have been possessed by The Devil in order to create such a fiendishly great print as this one! Bravo, Lastleaf, bravo!


2. “Guardians of The Galaxy” by Matt Ferguson

Matt Ferguson channels his inner “Star Wars” geek for this amazeballs poster for Marvel’s “Guardians of The Galaxy”!


1. “Agent Smith” by Robert Bruno

Agent Smith by Robert Bruno

Agent Smith by Robert Bruno

“Mister Anderson” is pretty much all we hear when staring at this wonderful print from the hand of Robert Bruno!


Honourable Mentions

“A Place Beyond The Pines” by Ben Mcleod

A Place Beyond The Pines by Ben McLeod

A Place Beyond The Pines by Ben McLeod


“True Detective” by Simon Delart

True Detective by Simon Delart

True Detective by Simon Delart


“Buck Rogers” by Signalnoise

Buck Rogers by Signalnoise

Buck Rogers by Signalnoise


Hang Out Inside A Tauntaun!

The Empire Strikes Back by Matt Ferguson

The Empire Strikes Back by Matt Ferguson

Check out this stellar piece from Matt Ferguson! Vader would be proud.

Follow Matt on Twitter!


Simon Delart Rocks The Vinyl.

Simon Delart, an illustrator out of Paris, France and a member of Poster Posse has created some wonderful conceptual art for movie soundtrack album covers! We wanted to feature some of the conceptual album cover art that Simon created as well as some awesome illustrations he has created for properties like “True Detective” and “X-Men: Days of Future Past”. Great work from yet another great illustrator!

Blade Runner by Simon Delart

Blade Runner by Simon Delart

Conan The Barbarian by Simon Delart

Conan The Barbarian by Simon Delart

Edward Scissorhands by Simon Delart

Edward Scissorhands by Simon Delart

Inception by Simon Delart

Inception by Simon Delart

Jurassic Park by Simon Delart

Jurassic Park by Simon Delart

Moon by Simon Delart

Moon by Simon Delart

Star Trek by Simon Delart

Star Trek by Simon Delart

Star Wars by Simon Delart

Star Wars by Simon Delart

Terminator 2 by Simon Delart

Terminator 2 by Simon Delart

The Lord of The Rings by Simon Delart

The Lord of The Rings by Simon Delart

Tron by Simon Delart

Tron by Simon Delart

True Detective by Simon Delart

True Detective by Simon Delart

X-Men Days of Future Past by Simon Delart

X-Men Days of Future Past by Simon Delart

You can find more work from Simon at the following links:

A Conversation With Robert Bruno!

We here at igotbirds.com love to interview illustrators and poster artists from all over the world. Tonight, we present to you an emerging Poster illustrator, a member of Poster Posse, and an all-around good guy, Robert Bruno! This is the very first podcast from igotbirds.com, so it may be a little rough around the edges in some spots but we think it’s well worth sharing! In this interview we touch on Robert’s early days, his work with Poster Posse, exhibiting at Bottleneck Gallery and Hero Complex Gallery, and why I wasn’t too fond of the Mondo Disney art show. So click on the MP3 Player above to hear a Conversation with Robert Bruno!

"The Green Mile" by Robert Bruno

“The Green Mile” by Robert Bruno

The Shawshank Redemption by Robert Bruno

The Shawshank Redemption by Robert Bruno

X-Men-Days of Future Past by Robert Bruno

X-Men-Days of Future Past by Robert Bruno

Agent Smith by Robert Bruno

Agent Smith by Robert Bruno

A Man In A Mask by Robert Bruno

A Man In A Mask by Robert Bruno

Captain America-The Winter Soldier by Robert Bruno

Captain America-The Winter Soldier by Robert Bruno

Peyton by Robert Bruno

Peyton by Robert Bruno

Maul by Robert Bruno

Maul by Robert Bruno

 

We’d like to thank Robert for taking time out of his busy schedule to speak with us. You can find Robert on his Website, Facebook, and Twitter. The MP3 interview will soon be available for download.

http://igotbirds.com/download/2014/03/Robert_Bruno.mp3

A Conversation With Kevin Burke.

Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six

Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six

 

Kevin Burke

Kevin Burke

 

Very recently (as of yesterday, in fact) we had the opportunity to conduct an interview via email with none other than the Director of “Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six“, Kevin Burke. Kevin was gracious enough to take time out of his busy schedule in Toronto, Canada to answer the questions of self-proclaimed “Poster Art Fanboys”.

For those of you who are not regular visitors to the Blog, “Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six” is an upcoming film produced by Post No Joes Productions documenting the revival and increasing popularity of the illustrated poster art scene. Kevin, as the Director of the film, has had numerous interactions with Designers and Illustrators all over the world, and sat down to speak with us regarding the origins of the project and his love of illustrated film posters. Without further ado, I present to you A Conversation with Kevin Burke!

 

igotbirds: Kevin, tell us a little about yourself and your early life. Where you grew up, what kinds of things were you into as a youth?

Kevin Burke: I grew up in a medium-sized Canadian city right across the border from Detroit – Windsor, Ontario. I was into movies as far back as I can remember – not just the stories and the escapism, but the general movie-going experience. Which, back then, was very different than it is today. Movie theatres and video stores used to celebrate the movies, celebrate nostalgia for the art. There were murals in our local theatre of famous scenes from old westerns and paired portraits of golden age stars all over the walls. The local video stores were very much the same. My first job was in a locally owned video store and I loved it – no uniforms, no 2 for 1 candy upselling, no bullshit – just a bunch of people who loved the movies and wanted to be around them 24/7. Then that video store, and all the others in town were muscled out by Blockbuster and Rogers, and now video stores are all but dead entirely. The same culture shift happened with the cinemas though – they were all bought out or out-sold by multiplexes with 24 screens, coffee bars and arcades and synergistic, cross-promotional visa cards with movie points. It used to be about the movies, man. Talking about it now I feel kind of sad for kids who will never be able to experience that – because now it seems like it’s all about screaming commerce into everyone’s face, as loudly as possible, as soon as they open the multiplex doors. Alternatives are starting to pop up though. In Toronto we have The Royal Cinema, Underground Cinema and others. I’m happy that indie cinemas are making a comeback, at least in bigger cities. I hope it spreads.

 

igotbirds: How did you get interested/involved in the movie poster art scene?

Kevin Burke: When I was a kid I collected one-sheets. I used to get put on a waiting list at the cinema and video stores and they would call me when a poster came down out of a marquee. Then I’d beg my parents to drive me there, or I’d bike, to go and pick it up. My walls were covered with posters as a kid. I kind of drifted away from movie posters around the same time that posters started to stray away from illustration in favour of the cheaper, easier to market, photoshopped alternative. I’d love to say that I had the foresight to see that posters were becoming bland and that’s the reason I stopped collecting, but the truth is that I became a teenager, and like most teenagers I decided that I was way too cool for anything and everything. It was just good timing. Fast forward to 2010 when my fiancee buys me an Olly Moss “There Will be Blood” print from Mondo and I’m hooked again and led to question what happened to posters over those couple of decades.

There Will Be Blood - Olly Moss

There Will Be Blood – Olly Moss

 

igotbirds: What made you want to create a film about movie poster artists?

Kevin Burke: Being a collector, a filmmaker, and noticing that there’s this glaring hole where a movie about poster art should be. I had mulled around the idea for a little while and had settled on doing it after completing another project. Then one day, my fiancee (and co-producer) Andrea gets a call from this really awesome horror lecture series in Toronto called The Black Museum (Seriously, look them up. They’re incredible) and they ask her to do an academic lecture on the history of horror movie posters. Perfect, right? So, in talking about the evolution of the art she decides to talk a little about modern screenprints in the lecture – we get in touch with Gary Pullin, who everyone will tell you is one of the friendliest horror maniacs in the world, and ask to shoot an interview with him to include in the lecture. He says “Sure thing.”, we say “Rad!” and we shoot this great interview with one of our favourite artists. And that pretty much sealed the deal on moving forward with the film for me. I figured – if all of these people creating the art that I love are as cool and fun as Pullin then I’d be stupid not to move on this. And so far the poster art community has welcomed the film with open arms and been amazing to work with. I’ve made a lot of great friends.

Friday The 13th by Gary Pullin

Friday The 13th by Gary Pullin

igotbirds: Being a filmmaker, what aspects of the filmmaking process are most important to you in conveying the individual stories of the poster artists you have encountered during the making of “Twenty-Four by Thirty-Six”?

Kevin Burke: The most important thing, to me, is creating an insightful film about movie posters and how they’ve evolved. I also intend to try and answer the question of whether or not illustrated screenprints fill a void for fans left behind by studio key art straying away from illustration. A key component of this is, of course, the artists who create them. We intend to use interview footage with the artists, and insights from them, to tell the story. Now obviously we won’t be able to focus on everyone’s life story as much as we’d like (but if you can get me an audience with A&E to pitch a mini-series…ha), but we do want to explore what it’s like to live as an artist working in this industry. We want fans and viewers to have a human element to relate to, because no one wants to just see heads talking at them for 90 minutes. So we’re going to be placing a special focus on a select few artists, each at a different place in their career and personal life, and giving some insight into what it’s like to live as a poster artist. We’re also going to be doing some really rad compositing in order to bring some of these great illustrations to life with unique animation. We’re bringing our “A Game” to this flick.

 

igotbirds: On average, how much time do you get to spend interviewing the various artists for this film? What artists have been your favorite to interview so far and why?

Kevin Burke: Everyone is different, depending on the situation. I live in Toronto and I’ll likely have the opportunity to interview Phantom City Creative 2 or 3 times before the film is complete, so we may spend a great deal of time together. But during my first trip to Austin, one day we knocked out 5 interviews, back to back, over a span of 2 hours. I’ll be in Austin again next weekend to speak with Laurent Durieux – I plan to sit with him for an hour or so and just have a chat, whereas if we were shooting the interview at his home in Brussels we would be able to tour his collection, workspace, etc… like we have been able to with other artists. So, it’s always dependent on what we’re able to make work within everyone’s schedule and location. It’s a hugely ambitious project and we’re speaking with a ton of artists. We look to make the best out of every interview scenario. As far as favourites go – everyone has been really pleasant to interview. I’ve made a lot of really cool friends in putting this together. I just interviewed Matt Ryan Tobin and Paul Ainsworth this weekend and had a lot of fun. They’re both really funny dudes. I plan on drinking many beers with them before our Canadian soil thaws in the spring.

Kevin Burke with Paige Reynolds & Justin Erickson of Phantom City Creative

Kevin Burke with Paige Reynolds & Justin Erickson of Phantom City Creative

 

Kevin Burke with Matt Ryan Tobin

Kevin Burke with Matt Ryan Tobin

 

igotbirds: Who are your favorite poster artists to collect?

Kevin Burke: Yikes! There are so many. I love Ken Taylor’s stuff. I just scored one of his “Where the Wild Things Are” prints off of a Mondo drop, so I guess fate was on my side that day. I really love Tracie Ching’s stuff too, and I dig what she’s doing in Kickstarting print projects. I think that’s a really great way to get art projects off the ground. I snagged one of her “War of the Worlds” prints by supporting her campaign and I can’t wait for it to come in. Pullin, Phantom City and Jason Edmiston of course. The aforementioned Paul Ainsworth and Matt Ryan Tobin – what can I say? I’m not going to profess to be any kind of art critic, but I see both of these guys doing huge things over the next couple of years. I finally saw Paul’s “Back to the Future” print in person, for instance, and holy shit – no pic on the internet can do that thing justice. There really are too many favourites to name.

War of The Worlds by Tracie Ching

War of The Worlds by Tracie Ching

 

Halloween by Phantom City Creative

Halloween by Phantom City Creative

 

Die Hard by Matt Ryan Tobin

Die Hard by Matt Ryan Tobin

 

Paul Ainsworth "Back to The Future"

Paul Ainsworth “Back to The Future”

igotbirds: Can you give us a rundown of the equipment you’re using to produce this film? Camera equipment, mics, editing equipment, digital storage, etc…

Kevin Burke: Sure. I’m shooting on a Blackmagic Cinema Camera which gives me a ton of colour control in post, and the image quality is stunning. We use a couple of DSLRs and a Panasonic HMC-40 as back-ups. We run a Sennheiser ME66 shotgun mic into a Tascam DR-60 audio recorder for interviews, and mic the artists up with Sennheiser lavs when they’re giving us tours of their homes, workspaces, etc. I edit and do motion graphic compositing through Adobe Creative Suite on a 2013 iMac i7 and store footage on 12Tb of LaCie Thunderbolt drive(s). We’ve been shooting with steadicam gimbals, vests, dolly track, sliders, you name it. My favourite part of every shooting day is looking over the dailies. I’m very excited to really sit down to work on post in the summer/fall.

A Nightmare On Elm Street III:  Dream Warriors poster by Jason Edmiston

A Nightmare On Elm Street III: Dream Warriors poster by Jason Edmiston

igotbirds: Can you talk a little bit about Post No Joes Productions? Your role in the company, what you’re looking forward to produce next, etc…

Kevin Burke: Post No Joes actually began as a little comedy sketch video troupe that me and my friends Richard Chan and Vance Gillis put together after college. We would get together and have meetings about conceptualizing shorts, run writing exercises, shoot some ad libbed stuff. Anything that we could do to keep working on film related projects to get practice and stay current. Post No Joes ended up creating commercial ads, music videos and gigs of that sort for clients and last year we co-produced our first documentary feature which ended up being picked up by The Documentary Channel here in Canada. Richard is co-producing Twenty-Four by Thirty-Six and working as Assistant Director. He’s a very active member of Post No Joes and we work on everything together. Vance is now living in Montreal knocking people dead on the improv and sketch comedy circuit – and I’m going to keep hassling him to write a narrative comedy for Post No Joes to produce until one of us dies/kills of frustration. We have a lot of ideas in the pipe to follow Twenty-Four by Thirty-Six, but as it stands it is our primary and daily focus. I’d love to produce a doc about the elderly Japanese citizens who volunteered to clean up the wreckage after the Fukushima disaster knowing they would die. They volunteered their lives to save younger citizens. Those sorts of stories are always really touching to me. We’re also working on a short subject doc about “Le Nain Rouge”, the historical Detroit urban legend of the little red demon that has been sighted at disasters in the motor city. And yeah – narrative comedy and horror. One day.

Kevin Burke outdoors

Kevin Burke outdoors

 

Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six by Paul Ainsworth

Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six by Paul Ainsworth

 

We here at igotbirds.com would like to thank Kevin Burke for taking time to speak with us. You can follow Kevin on Twitter, as well as Post No Joes. Be sure to visit the links featured in our interview and be on the lookout for “Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six” in the Fall of 2014!

Paul Ainsworth, A Designer To Watch!

Paul Ainsworth "Twenty-Four by Thirty-Six"

Paul Ainsworth “Twenty-Four by Thirty-Six”

I was first introduced to Canadian Illustrator/Designer Paul Ainsworth when I contributed to Kevin Burke’s upcoming film “Twenty-Four by Thirty-Six“. Ainsworth designed a poster which will be given as a Kickstarter “award” for monetary contributions received to help fund the film. Anywho, I check out Paul’s website and was pleasantly surprised by the illustrations found there. Ainsworth’s linework, sense of color, and overall compositions are full of energy, and one can tell that he has a very well-honed sense of design.

Here’s a little about Paul from his Website: “My name is Paul Ainsworth and I am a bilingual Graphic Designer and Illustrator. I was born and raised in Northern Ontario and I currently live and work in Southern Ontario.

In 2001 I graduated from the Ontario College of Art & Design where I majored in Illustration in the Communication & Design Department. Since then, I have continued to broaden my experience through OCAD by exploring a number of courses in their Advertising Department.

Since the summer of 2012, I have been working as a freelance designer and Illustrator doing large projects through contract with Taxi Canada Ltd., Sid Lee Advertising, Bruce Mau Design and a number of other collaborators. The experience of not only doing work for clients such as Bud Light, Kraft, Unilever and a number of other projects have made a significant mark on my work ethics, my creativity as well as how I collaborate with others. With that in mind I have been collaborating efforts as well on a number of projects for the Country Music Festival Boots & Hearts. Four years prior to this, I have worked as a Designer in a well-known Advertising and Communications firm. The majority of our clients are Fortune 500 companies in the Pharmaceutical Industry, including GlaxoSmithKline Inc., Allergan, and Lilly.

I enjoy my freelance work for the exposure that it gives me to other industries such as music, film, fashion, and television. I have also been creating poster art for a number of galleries around Canada and the United States. I am also in the early stages of creating a small independent clothing line. These experiences have given me a better understanding of my client’s needs, the significance of deadlines, and the overall delivery process from landing a contract to handing over the final product.

I have collaborated with Tony Hawk Clothing Company, Warner Music Group, the National Hockey League and Craig Kielburger’s charity organization Free The Children.

On a more personal side, I’m also a seasoned (out of shape) hockey player, a mediocre guitar player, a husband and a dad to a beautiful little girl.

I am always available to discuss work opportunities, freelance possibilities, and the Leafs’ quest for the Cup (or lack thereof).

I’ve started to follow Paul Ainsworth on Instagram as well as Facebook, and am excited to see what new designs he has coming up. His “Flight of The Navigator” poster is on my short-list of posters to acquire in the near-future.

Paul Ainsworth "Flight of The Navigator"

Paul Ainsworth “Flight of The Navigator”

Paul Ainsworth "Pee-Wee's Big Adventure"

Paul Ainsworth “Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure”

Paul Ainsworth "Pacific Rim"

Paul Ainsworth “Pacific Rim”

Paul Ainsworth "Rocky IV"

Paul Ainsworth “Rocky IV”

Paul Ainsworth "Back to The Future"

Paul Ainsworth “Back to The Future”

Snow Day Edition!

Looks like today is a snow day around here, so I thought I would post some HUGE news! Recently, I was able to acquire not one but TWO Mondo posters! These are the first Mondo posters I have ever managed to get my hands on, and I have to say it’s pretty exciting.

I scored a copy of Ken Taylor’s “An American Werewolf in London” poster through Mitch Putnam’s Postersandtoys.com, and a copy of Daniel Danger’s “The Town” through Mondo itself. The wait to get both prints framed will kill me, as I want to hang them as soon as possible!

Ken Taylor-American Werewolf in London

Ken Taylor-American Werewolf in London

Daniel Danger - "The Town"

Daniel Danger – “The Town”

Chris B. Murray. The Sickest of All Illustrators!

Very often when I’m working on some freelance project…oh, I’m a Graphic and Web Designer, by the way…I’ll peruse some Design websites or Instagram to see what’s new and who’s upcoming in the world of Art, Design, Illustration, Site Development, etc… Now, because this site is going to be “the whole kitchen sink” in terms of content, I figure that from time to time I’ll post links to some artists and designers whose work I admire. Don’t fear, the random stories of the life of my girlfriend and I will continue to be published. This is just a little sojourn into things I like.

Chris B. Murray's "Contact".  2013.

Chris B. Murray’s “Contact”. 2013.

Chris B. Murray's "Forbidden Fruit".  2013.

Chris B. Murray’s “Forbidden Fruit”. 2013.

Now it’s time to witness the sickest of illustrators, Chris B. Murray! This guy kills it every single time with his work. He currently lives and works in Philly, PA, home of the brotherly shove, and designs for such esteemed publications as The New Yorker and album covers for bands like Demigodz. Chris also does some work for British streetwear label AnyForty. His work is amazing, and needs your attention! Check him out by clicking on his name in this blog entry!