“I Dreamed I Was A Fly



…who became a man.”

Grey Matter Art and Acme Archives present “The Fly” from artist, Matt Ryan Tobin!

Grey Matter Art is excited to announce our new partnership with Acme Archives to offer licensed prints for 20th Century Fox and DreamWorks. To kick-off our partnership, we are proud to announce a new officially licensed, limited edition screen print for the classic 80’s film, “The Fly” by the very talented artist, Matt Ryan Tobin. GMA is thrilled to be working with Matt & Acme Archives to showcase this amazing poster for the film’s 30th anniversary. “The Fly” will be featured as 2 separate editions, a regular and a glow in the dark variant.

The Fly - Regular Edition

The Fly – Regular Edition

The Fly - Variant Edition

The Fly – Variant Edition

The Fly - Variant GID

The Fly – Variant GID

  • Artist: Matt Ryan Tobin
  • Size: 24×36
  • Regular Edition: 175/$45.00
  • GID Variant Edition: 100/$60.00
  • Printed by: VGKids

This poster will be released on Wednesday, September 21st on Grey Matter’s website shop page at 1:00 PM (EST) at www.greymatterart.com

About Grey Matter Art:

Founded in New York in 2013, Grey Matter Art is a limited edition, studio licensed film and entertainment Poster Company. We aim to take an industry inspired by pop culture, and reinvent it using the techniques that other companies have made successful, but take them to a new level. Our goal here is to bring our unique brand of creativity to the marketplace for collector’s items such as licensed posters, apparel, and other great merchandise. Grey Matter Art has worked with studios such as Marvel, MGM, Studiocanal, Miramax, and Paramount. Understanding how special these pieces of art are to collectors, we will put the utmost care and professionalism into packaging and shipping.

About Acme:

Created in 1996 by founder Lisa McLain Acme Archives has grown to be a leader in officially licensed art products from many pop-culture titles. Acme Archives is the official licensee for art products from many motion picture, gaming and television studios including Twentieth Century Fox, Halo, DreamWorks, Disney, Disney-Lucasfilm, Warner Bros- DC Comics, Blizzard, *Disney Star Wars and Indiana Jones. Acme is a staple at Comic Con San Diego and engages in many other art events throughout the year. Acme has recently launched its Marquee Artist Program presenting art from some of the top entertainment and fine artists in the market today. See www.acmearchivesdirect.com for details.


Black Swan by Matt Ryan Tobin


Oh yeah! It’s happened! Matt Tobin has hit the big time! Mondo will be selling Matt’s latest print for “Black Swan” on Thursday, February 18th.

Black Swan by Matt Ryan Tobin - Regular Edition

Black Swan by Matt Ryan Tobin – Regular Edition

  • Black Swan by Matt Ryan Tobin
  • 24″x36″ Screen Print
  • Edition of 225
  • Printed by D&L Screenprinting
  • $40
Black Swan by Matt Ryan Tobin - Variant Edition

Black Swan by Matt Ryan Tobin – Variant Edition

  • Black Swan (Variant) by Matt Ryan Tobin
  • 24″x36″ Screen Print
  • Edition of 125
  • Printed by D&L Screenprinting
  • $60

We’re thrilled that Matt is getting the kudos he so rightly deserves and “Black Swan” is yet another brilliant print from his artistic mind.

Be sure to follow Mondo on Twitter for the official drop time and give Matt a follow as well!


Matt Ryan Tobin at Hero Complex Gallery


The awesome and awe-inspiring Matt Ryan Tobin is part of a group show at LA’s own Hero Complex Gallery. The show, Quattro With a Shotgun, also features work from Vance Kelly, New Flesh and James Rheem Davis.

Matt has some new, fantastic work created for inclusion in this show, and I for one, want them all! Matt’s illustrations for The Blair Witch Project and Let The Right One In are especially great, and we love the fact that we can see Matt’s artwork just getting better and better with each print he releases.

If you haven’t seen his work on the “Interview With The Vampire” private commission, you NEED to search for it on this site and check it out!

All of the remaining work from Quattro With a Shotgun are on sale at Hero Complex Gallery’s online store!

Matt Ryan Tobin

Death Has Come to Your Little Town by Matt Ryan Tobin

Death Has Come to Your Little Town by Matt Ryan Tobin

The Bloodsucking Brady Bunch by Matt Ryan Tobin

The Bloodsucking Brady Bunch by Matt Ryan Tobin

Miles To Go Before We Sleep by Matt Ryan Tobin

Miles To Go Before We Sleep by Matt Ryan Tobin

Let The Right One In by Matt Ryan Tobin

Let The Right One In by Matt Ryan Tobin


James Rheem Davis

Alien by James Rheem Davis

Alien by James Rheem Davis

Apocalypse Now by James Rheem Davis

Apocalypse Now by James Rheem Davis


Vance Kelly

Faith No More by Vance Kelly

Faith No More by Vance Kelly

This Time It's War by Vance Kelly

This Time It’s War by Vance Kelly


New Flesh

Aliens by New Flesh

Aliens by New Flesh

The Martian by New Flesh

The Martian by New Flesh

Matt Ryan Tobin & The Silver Shamrock

It’s time. It’s time. Time for the big giveaway. Halloween has come. All you lucky kids with Silver Shamrock masks, gather ’round your TV set, put on your masks and watch. All witches, all skeletons, all Jack-O-Lanterns, gather ’round and watch. Watch the magic pumpkin. Watch…

Illustrator and designer Matt Ryan Tobin is just unbelievable. I mean, you think that the guy CAN’T get any better than his last commissioned poster for “Interview with The Vampire” and then he turns out an astounding commissioned poster based on my favorite film in the Halloween series…”Halloween III: Season of The Witch“.

Halloween III Season of The Witch by Matt Ryan Tobin

Halloween III : Season of The Witch by Matt Ryan Tobin

Halloween III Season of the Witch by Matt Ryan Tobin GID

Halloween III: Season of the Witch by Matt Ryan Tobin GID

Just look at this thing! It’s spectacular and I wish I was part of that commission group!

Here’s a little of what Matt had to say about this poster…

“This wasn’t the concept I was set on originally at all, but boy am I glad I chose it. Ever since I was approached to tackle H3 – I was pretty excited. It was a horror movie that had a lot of sci-fi elements to it. I was really looking forward to making a poster for a horror movie that wasn’t necessarily horrific (in the obvious sense) looking. My original concept was more scenic and simple, less abstract and when I went pencil to paper with the preliminary sketch for this – it just made sense to make something a little less conventional for a movie thats…a little less conventional.

I knew from the get-go the color palette I wanted. Thats one for sure thing. There had to be retro television elements as well. Once the pencil sketch was laid out – I actually didn’t stray too far from it. There was more calculation to this piece than a lot of my passed ones – however, I loved being able to be a little wreckless in the coloring / warped imagery. Less precise in shading and what not.

This is a fun print and the glow factor I think makes this even cooler. So happy with how it came out.”

Follow Matt on Twitter and check out his Website for more killer work!


Matt Ryan Tobin Interviews The Vampire

ANOTHER stunning private commission from the hand of Matt Ryan Tobin! This time, Matt travels to the dark, haunted corners of New Orleans to bring us “Interview With The Vampire”. Based on Anne Rice’s acclaimed novel of the same name, the film version of “Interview…” starred Tom Cruise as Lestat, a centuries-old vampire, and co-starred Brad Pitt and Kirsten Dunst as fellow vampires Louis and Claudia.

Interview With The Vampire by Matt Ryan Tobin

Interview With The Vampire by Matt Ryan Tobin

Here’s what Matt had to say about his latest piece..

This. Was fun.
I was commissioned by a private group to create a poster for one of the greatest Vampire films/book adaptations. My oldest memory of this film was watching it at a relatives house. For some reason – the image of the rotting mother’s corpse always stuck with me – the stomach turning feeling I got watching Lestat dance with the body – yet as gruesome as the film can be, it carried itself in a very elegant manner. Be it the time period, or the fancy garb or what have you. I wanted to create a poster that was simple and elegant and honored that vibe.

The lack of color and use of negative space was 100% intended from the beginning. I think it creates a sort of eerie, vacantness that I think compliments the symbolism in the film and is a cool contrast against all the texture/detail and grit. The statuesque chiseled-hard lines of each characters faces was meant to symbolize eternal youth. Stoic – only the eyes bright, although void of color. Fraying Stargazer Lilies – symbolizing sympathy in death…and what vampire themed poster wouldn’t benefit from a couple drops of blood? Oh – can you see the coffin?
Enough mumbo jumbo. This film is fucking awesome.

Interview With The Vampire by Matt Ryan Tobin - glow-in-the-dark

Interview With The Vampire by Matt Ryan Tobin – glow-in-the-dark

Matt really pulls it off with this one! Very cool AND it freakin’ GLOWS-IN-THE-DARK! I would have loved to hang this at the homestead.

To stay up-to-date with all the awesome artwork coming from Matt, be sure to follow him on Twitter and at his website!

Interview With The Vampire by Matt Ryan Tobin - detail 001

Interview With The Vampire by Matt Ryan Tobin – detail 001

Interview With The Vampire by Matt Ryan Tobin - detail 002

Interview With The Vampire by Matt Ryan Tobin – detail 002

A Conversation With Matt Ryan Tobin.

Matt Ryan Tobin-True Romance

Matt Ryan Tobin-True Romance

 

Tonight we are beyond pleased to feature Canadian Designer & Illustrator, Matt Ryan Tobin. Matt took time away from his schedule to answer all sorts of questions from us, touching upon his early years as an illustrator to his opinion on the now booming popularity of the Gig and Film Poster Scene. Our sincere thanks to Matt for taking some time to speak with us. And now…A Conversation With Matt Ryan Tobin!

 

igotbirds: Matt, we like to start things off by asking the illustrators we interview if they could tell us a little about their background. What led you to decide on a career in Design/Illustration?

Matt Tobin: I’ve always been drawing. Since I was a little kid but being the kind of person I am – I was always searching for my place in the world. I was into a lot of things growing up. Dipping my toes in everything. When I was around 9 the doodles kind of came to a halt and music took over. It’s my first passion. I started playing guitar and everything changed. When I was in high school is when I got back into it. I sucked at everything that wasn’t a class that allowed me to express myself. I did everything in my power to get by on Creative Writing, Art, Photography and Film classes. It was around that time drawing and design kicked back in.

 

igotbirds: You’ve done a decent amount of design work and illustration for apparel and logo/branding gigs. Can you tell us about how you came to find yourself illustrating and designing for bands?

Matt Tobin: I really started taking it seriously around 2003 when my band at the time, and for 10 years to follow, Dead And Divine was in need of t-shirt designs for our first few shows. We had no money to pay an artist, nor knew any around. I was familiar in Photoshop already so I dove in. From there I just kept designing our merch and eventually word got around that’s what I did. Shortly after other bands began asking me to design their merch as well. Design was always something I’ve been passionate about. I used to design band fan websites purely for fun. There was this small online circle of websites run and created by fans. It was a way to take a theme I was passionate about and create something based on it. I think thats why I eventually fell in love with film poster design. Taking an existing theme (in these cases bands and films) and creating something to compliment it or honour it from an fanboy/artistic standpoint.

 

Matt Ryan Tobin-As I Lay Dying

Matt Ryan Tobin-As I Lay Dying

 

igotbirds: I have to say that your T-Shirt designs and illustrations for As I Lay Dying are really great pieces. I would think for a “heavier” band such as themselves, skulls and snakes seem to fit pretty well with their overall motif. Do you have a lot of artistic freedom in the kinds of designs that you produce for a band like As I Lay Dying?

Matt Tobin: Thanks man! Well it depends. Sometimes bands have a ready concept they want to see executed. Those are my favourite to do. I can always add my own flare but it helps when bands give direction. If it’s a band I’ve worked for consistently, I tend to know what they’re into and at that point I just whip things up I think would work for them and it usually flies. It’s fun to have that comfortability with a client.

 

Matt Ryan Tobin-Underoath

Matt Ryan Tobin-Underoath

 

igotbirds: You’ve also produced some Gig Posters for bands like Underoath, which by the way is a really stunning poster. What kind of choices do you have to make as an artist when deciding on a theme for a Gig Poster?

Matt Tobin: Thank you again! That was a lot of fun to make. The band gave me full artistic freedom on that print. It was a farewell tour poster – so, in my eyes, it had to encompass death. It’s one of those pieces that I don’t think I really put too much thought into. Just kind of went with it blindly and what came out was pretty cool looking! Most gig posters I’ve seen, and even ones I admire, seem to have been given zero to go on via the band. It’s more in the artists realm of just creating great imagery, I think. It’s like two worlds of art combining with no guidelines or direction and that can be awesome as well. Free reign. A lot of magic can happen when that’s the case.

 

igotbirds: Moving away from your branding and apparel work, how did it come about that you found yourself illustrating Film Posters?

Matt Tobin: I truly fell in love with poster design when I first gazed upon James Rheem DavisLost Boys” poster for Mondo. I somehow came across it and was trying to track it down so I could own it. Through my research I found out about Mondo and the underground world of alternative poster art. I was hooked. Film is also one of my biggest passions. Like I mentioned before, being younger I dipped my toes in everything. There was a point before the band where I was actually aiming to have a career in film. So yeah, I wanted so badly to create posters for films I love.

 

igotbirds: Let’s talk for a minute about your Poster for “True Romance”. It’s a really stunning poster and it appeals to me in the same way as a Tyler Stout poster, in that it features most of the major players in “True Romance” as Stout tends to do in a lot of his Film Poster illustrations. Can you talk about your thoughts behind the creation of the poster illustration and also the bold color palette you brought to it?

Matt Tobin: The True Romance poster was a big deal for me. It was my first officially licensed print. The cool thing was I already had a concept in mind before I was approached by the folks at Odd City. It was awesome to be able to bring to life a concept I had been aching to do. True Romance is one of my favourite films. I think the choice to portray every important character was a must. The abundance of talent and familiar faces in that film are astounding. Each character is memorable. Had to do ’em all! I really wanted to capture the films early ’90s feel with the colour palette. Bright and vivid. Pinks and turquoises. In the back of my head I always wanted to include some comic book and Japanese elements that are apparent in the movie too.

 

Matt Ryan Tobin-True Romance Variant Edition

Matt Ryan Tobin-True Romance Variant Edition

 

igotbirds: Keeping with the “True Romance” theme, the Poster was a HUGE success with Odd City, selling out very, very quickly. As artists we tend to work in solitude and maybe don’t realize how much our work impacts those around us. Does it ever come as a shock when you see how much demand there is for a very well-done piece such as “True Romance”?

Matt Tobin: Well, to be honest, I think I personally was desiring a True Romance print! The fact that I got the opportunity to create it myself was flattering…and nerve-wracking. I was beyond shocked when they sold out. I’m a new kid on the block and poster aficionados are very picky with who does what poster for what movie and how its executed. The fact that some of those people appreciated the poster enough to want it in their homes is incredible. Feels so rewarding.

 

Matt Ryan Tobin-Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six Variant Edition

Matt Ryan Tobin-Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six Variant Edition

 

igotbirds: I am an avid, voracious collector of comic books, and have been since the age of six. I always felt like the Comic Book world was MY World, and that the kids I went to school with and the people I interacted with outside of that world could never understand my love and passion for the art form. Then Hollywood came along, and while I do greatly enjoy the films, I feel like MY World has been snatched away from me and now Frat guys and jocks love Marvel and DC but in a much different way than I do. With the good side such as documentaries on the Scene cropping up and Mondo releases selling out in literally seconds, and the bad side which are the dreaded “poster flippers” on eBay, who I really feel could care less about the art and are only in it for profit, what are your thoughts on the exposure that the Gig and Film Poster Scenes are getting these days?

Matt Tobin: Well I think it’s like anything, man. Everyone has that one thing they love that feels sort of secret and special. I don’t care who you are, when that “thing” becomes popular it makes you angry. You’ve been appreciating it more and longer than everyone else. It’s yours. It’s your “thing”. But it happens with everything. Uncool inevitably becomes cool. I was a loser in grade school who read comics and didn’t socialize, and dressed different than most. Most of the things I love felt taken from me when I saw them first. However, looking at the grand scheme of things; the fact that all these new people are appreciating comic books and poster art are only concreting these things in pop culture as something to be cherished and noticed by everyone. I think we all can get a little hypocritical from time to time. I remember thinking everything mainstream was awful. Now the things I love are mainstream. I should appreciate it now, a lot less sucks than it did before.

 

Matt Ryan Tobin-They Love

Matt Ryan Tobin-They Love

 

igotbirds: Can you give us a hint about any upcoming projects you may be working on? Is there a “dream” project you would love to tackle?

Matt Tobin: I’m working on some gallery pieces right now for some rad shows at Hero Complex Gallery and other things I can’t really mention! As for a dream project…There’s so many things I would love to do. I know I’ve already created a poster for Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey a while back – but I feel it is owed a revisiting. I would love to do a Bill & Ted 1 & 2 set of posters.

 

Matt Ryan Tobin-Die Hard

Matt Ryan Tobin-Die Hard

 

Matt Ryan Tobin-Deadlights

Matt Ryan Tobin-Deadlights

igotbirds: Matt, can you tell people where to find you on the Internet? Facebook, Twitter, Website, etc…?

Matt Tobin: I’m all over the inter-webs!

We would like to thank Matt Tobin for being awesome and taking time to answer our questions. Please hit up the links featured in this interview, and please check out the work of Matt Tobin at www.worksofmattryan.com.

A Conversation With Kevin Burke.

Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six

Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six

 

Kevin Burke

Kevin Burke

 

Very recently (as of yesterday, in fact) we had the opportunity to conduct an interview via email with none other than the Director of “Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six“, Kevin Burke. Kevin was gracious enough to take time out of his busy schedule in Toronto, Canada to answer the questions of self-proclaimed “Poster Art Fanboys”.

For those of you who are not regular visitors to the Blog, “Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six” is an upcoming film produced by Post No Joes Productions documenting the revival and increasing popularity of the illustrated poster art scene. Kevin, as the Director of the film, has had numerous interactions with Designers and Illustrators all over the world, and sat down to speak with us regarding the origins of the project and his love of illustrated film posters. Without further ado, I present to you A Conversation with Kevin Burke!

 

igotbirds: Kevin, tell us a little about yourself and your early life. Where you grew up, what kinds of things were you into as a youth?

Kevin Burke: I grew up in a medium-sized Canadian city right across the border from Detroit – Windsor, Ontario. I was into movies as far back as I can remember – not just the stories and the escapism, but the general movie-going experience. Which, back then, was very different than it is today. Movie theatres and video stores used to celebrate the movies, celebrate nostalgia for the art. There were murals in our local theatre of famous scenes from old westerns and paired portraits of golden age stars all over the walls. The local video stores were very much the same. My first job was in a locally owned video store and I loved it – no uniforms, no 2 for 1 candy upselling, no bullshit – just a bunch of people who loved the movies and wanted to be around them 24/7. Then that video store, and all the others in town were muscled out by Blockbuster and Rogers, and now video stores are all but dead entirely. The same culture shift happened with the cinemas though – they were all bought out or out-sold by multiplexes with 24 screens, coffee bars and arcades and synergistic, cross-promotional visa cards with movie points. It used to be about the movies, man. Talking about it now I feel kind of sad for kids who will never be able to experience that – because now it seems like it’s all about screaming commerce into everyone’s face, as loudly as possible, as soon as they open the multiplex doors. Alternatives are starting to pop up though. In Toronto we have The Royal Cinema, Underground Cinema and others. I’m happy that indie cinemas are making a comeback, at least in bigger cities. I hope it spreads.

 

igotbirds: How did you get interested/involved in the movie poster art scene?

Kevin Burke: When I was a kid I collected one-sheets. I used to get put on a waiting list at the cinema and video stores and they would call me when a poster came down out of a marquee. Then I’d beg my parents to drive me there, or I’d bike, to go and pick it up. My walls were covered with posters as a kid. I kind of drifted away from movie posters around the same time that posters started to stray away from illustration in favour of the cheaper, easier to market, photoshopped alternative. I’d love to say that I had the foresight to see that posters were becoming bland and that’s the reason I stopped collecting, but the truth is that I became a teenager, and like most teenagers I decided that I was way too cool for anything and everything. It was just good timing. Fast forward to 2010 when my fiancee buys me an Olly Moss “There Will be Blood” print from Mondo and I’m hooked again and led to question what happened to posters over those couple of decades.

There Will Be Blood - Olly Moss

There Will Be Blood – Olly Moss

 

igotbirds: What made you want to create a film about movie poster artists?

Kevin Burke: Being a collector, a filmmaker, and noticing that there’s this glaring hole where a movie about poster art should be. I had mulled around the idea for a little while and had settled on doing it after completing another project. Then one day, my fiancee (and co-producer) Andrea gets a call from this really awesome horror lecture series in Toronto called The Black Museum (Seriously, look them up. They’re incredible) and they ask her to do an academic lecture on the history of horror movie posters. Perfect, right? So, in talking about the evolution of the art she decides to talk a little about modern screenprints in the lecture – we get in touch with Gary Pullin, who everyone will tell you is one of the friendliest horror maniacs in the world, and ask to shoot an interview with him to include in the lecture. He says “Sure thing.”, we say “Rad!” and we shoot this great interview with one of our favourite artists. And that pretty much sealed the deal on moving forward with the film for me. I figured – if all of these people creating the art that I love are as cool and fun as Pullin then I’d be stupid not to move on this. And so far the poster art community has welcomed the film with open arms and been amazing to work with. I’ve made a lot of great friends.

Friday The 13th by Gary Pullin

Friday The 13th by Gary Pullin

igotbirds: Being a filmmaker, what aspects of the filmmaking process are most important to you in conveying the individual stories of the poster artists you have encountered during the making of “Twenty-Four by Thirty-Six”?

Kevin Burke: The most important thing, to me, is creating an insightful film about movie posters and how they’ve evolved. I also intend to try and answer the question of whether or not illustrated screenprints fill a void for fans left behind by studio key art straying away from illustration. A key component of this is, of course, the artists who create them. We intend to use interview footage with the artists, and insights from them, to tell the story. Now obviously we won’t be able to focus on everyone’s life story as much as we’d like (but if you can get me an audience with A&E to pitch a mini-series…ha), but we do want to explore what it’s like to live as an artist working in this industry. We want fans and viewers to have a human element to relate to, because no one wants to just see heads talking at them for 90 minutes. So we’re going to be placing a special focus on a select few artists, each at a different place in their career and personal life, and giving some insight into what it’s like to live as a poster artist. We’re also going to be doing some really rad compositing in order to bring some of these great illustrations to life with unique animation. We’re bringing our “A Game” to this flick.

 

igotbirds: On average, how much time do you get to spend interviewing the various artists for this film? What artists have been your favorite to interview so far and why?

Kevin Burke: Everyone is different, depending on the situation. I live in Toronto and I’ll likely have the opportunity to interview Phantom City Creative 2 or 3 times before the film is complete, so we may spend a great deal of time together. But during my first trip to Austin, one day we knocked out 5 interviews, back to back, over a span of 2 hours. I’ll be in Austin again next weekend to speak with Laurent Durieux – I plan to sit with him for an hour or so and just have a chat, whereas if we were shooting the interview at his home in Brussels we would be able to tour his collection, workspace, etc… like we have been able to with other artists. So, it’s always dependent on what we’re able to make work within everyone’s schedule and location. It’s a hugely ambitious project and we’re speaking with a ton of artists. We look to make the best out of every interview scenario. As far as favourites go – everyone has been really pleasant to interview. I’ve made a lot of really cool friends in putting this together. I just interviewed Matt Ryan Tobin and Paul Ainsworth this weekend and had a lot of fun. They’re both really funny dudes. I plan on drinking many beers with them before our Canadian soil thaws in the spring.

Kevin Burke with Paige Reynolds & Justin Erickson of Phantom City Creative

Kevin Burke with Paige Reynolds & Justin Erickson of Phantom City Creative

 

Kevin Burke with Matt Ryan Tobin

Kevin Burke with Matt Ryan Tobin

 

igotbirds: Who are your favorite poster artists to collect?

Kevin Burke: Yikes! There are so many. I love Ken Taylor’s stuff. I just scored one of his “Where the Wild Things Are” prints off of a Mondo drop, so I guess fate was on my side that day. I really love Tracie Ching’s stuff too, and I dig what she’s doing in Kickstarting print projects. I think that’s a really great way to get art projects off the ground. I snagged one of her “War of the Worlds” prints by supporting her campaign and I can’t wait for it to come in. Pullin, Phantom City and Jason Edmiston of course. The aforementioned Paul Ainsworth and Matt Ryan Tobin – what can I say? I’m not going to profess to be any kind of art critic, but I see both of these guys doing huge things over the next couple of years. I finally saw Paul’s “Back to the Future” print in person, for instance, and holy shit – no pic on the internet can do that thing justice. There really are too many favourites to name.

War of The Worlds by Tracie Ching

War of The Worlds by Tracie Ching

 

Halloween by Phantom City Creative

Halloween by Phantom City Creative

 

Die Hard by Matt Ryan Tobin

Die Hard by Matt Ryan Tobin

 

Paul Ainsworth "Back to The Future"

Paul Ainsworth “Back to The Future”

igotbirds: Can you give us a rundown of the equipment you’re using to produce this film? Camera equipment, mics, editing equipment, digital storage, etc…

Kevin Burke: Sure. I’m shooting on a Blackmagic Cinema Camera which gives me a ton of colour control in post, and the image quality is stunning. We use a couple of DSLRs and a Panasonic HMC-40 as back-ups. We run a Sennheiser ME66 shotgun mic into a Tascam DR-60 audio recorder for interviews, and mic the artists up with Sennheiser lavs when they’re giving us tours of their homes, workspaces, etc. I edit and do motion graphic compositing through Adobe Creative Suite on a 2013 iMac i7 and store footage on 12Tb of LaCie Thunderbolt drive(s). We’ve been shooting with steadicam gimbals, vests, dolly track, sliders, you name it. My favourite part of every shooting day is looking over the dailies. I’m very excited to really sit down to work on post in the summer/fall.

A Nightmare On Elm Street III:  Dream Warriors poster by Jason Edmiston

A Nightmare On Elm Street III: Dream Warriors poster by Jason Edmiston

igotbirds: Can you talk a little bit about Post No Joes Productions? Your role in the company, what you’re looking forward to produce next, etc…

Kevin Burke: Post No Joes actually began as a little comedy sketch video troupe that me and my friends Richard Chan and Vance Gillis put together after college. We would get together and have meetings about conceptualizing shorts, run writing exercises, shoot some ad libbed stuff. Anything that we could do to keep working on film related projects to get practice and stay current. Post No Joes ended up creating commercial ads, music videos and gigs of that sort for clients and last year we co-produced our first documentary feature which ended up being picked up by The Documentary Channel here in Canada. Richard is co-producing Twenty-Four by Thirty-Six and working as Assistant Director. He’s a very active member of Post No Joes and we work on everything together. Vance is now living in Montreal knocking people dead on the improv and sketch comedy circuit – and I’m going to keep hassling him to write a narrative comedy for Post No Joes to produce until one of us dies/kills of frustration. We have a lot of ideas in the pipe to follow Twenty-Four by Thirty-Six, but as it stands it is our primary and daily focus. I’d love to produce a doc about the elderly Japanese citizens who volunteered to clean up the wreckage after the Fukushima disaster knowing they would die. They volunteered their lives to save younger citizens. Those sorts of stories are always really touching to me. We’re also working on a short subject doc about “Le Nain Rouge”, the historical Detroit urban legend of the little red demon that has been sighted at disasters in the motor city. And yeah – narrative comedy and horror. One day.

Kevin Burke outdoors

Kevin Burke outdoors

 

Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six by Paul Ainsworth

Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six by Paul Ainsworth

 

We here at igotbirds.com would like to thank Kevin Burke for taking time to speak with us. You can follow Kevin on Twitter, as well as Post No Joes. Be sure to visit the links featured in our interview and be on the lookout for “Twenty-Four By Thirty-Six” in the Fall of 2014!